Insist + gerund/infinitive

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Prower

Banned
Russian
I have come across an intersting usage of INSIST. Why don't we use TO with infinitive here? Is it the subjunctive mood here or what?
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Don't insist your (to) baby finish every bottle.
you don't insist your boyfriend (to) stay awake.
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Is it ok to use gerund here?
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Don't insist your baby finishing every bottle.
You don't insist your boyfriend staying awake.
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The infinitive would be: You have a right to insist on your own meals.

    Here are some thoughts for your sentences:

    Don't insist that your baby finish every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist that your boyfriend stay awake.

    Don't insist on your baby's finishing every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist on your boyfriend's staying awake.

    Now that I've looked at those first two, I'm also considering these:
    Don't insist that your baby finishes every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist that your boyfriend stays awake.

    Perhaps someone can clarify my own doubts on those two.
     
    Last edited:

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    The infinitive would be: You have a right to insist on your own meals.

    I am talking about the infinitive AFTER insist

    Here are some thoughts for your sentences:

    Don't insist that your baby finish every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist that your boyfriend stay awake.


    SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD

    Don't insist on your baby's finishing every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist on your boyfriend's staying awake.

    GERUND


    Now that I've looked at those first two, I'm also considering these:
    Don't insist that your baby finishes every bottle.
    You shouldn't insist that your boyfriend stays awake. (I think this is wrong) It has anothin meaning here. You don't have to insist on the fact that your boyfriend stays awake.

    Perhaps someone can clarify my own doubts on those two.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello Prower

    Don't insist that your baby finish every bottle.
    Finish, here, is indeed the subjunctive.

    BrE (but not, I think, AmE - there are previous threads) can use the indicative here, with exactly the same meaning:
    Don't insist that your baby finishes every bottle.

    If you want to use a gerund, it would be
    Don't insist on your baby['s] finishing every bottle.
     
    Last edited:

    Prower

    Banned
    Russian
    So they just left out THAT? Is THAT not important?

    Don't insist (that) your baby finish every bottle.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    So they just left out THAT? Is THAT not important?

    Don't insist (that) your baby finish every bottle.
    I, a BrE speaker, would happily leave out the "that" in
    Don't insist [that] your baby finishes every bottle.

    You may need an AmE speaker to advise on which sounds better out of:
    Don't insist that your baby finish every bottle.
    Don't insist your baby finish every bottle.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    I've seen a fancy name for it here, and perhaps someone will eventually provide it, but I would always use the subjunctive, with or without "that," after verbs involving directing or commanding:

    I insist that your baby finish every bottle.
    I command that you be executed.
    It is hereby ordered that he remain in prison.

    Use of the indicative ("insist your baby finishes"; "command that you are executed") sounds illiterate/uneducated to me.

    —AmE Speaker
     
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