insist in

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Alazyguy

Member
Chinese
Winston Churchill insisted in going back on the gold standard in 1925 despite its putting the real economy on the rack.
Is this usage correct?A typo?As far as I know, it should be "insist on" or perhaps "persist in"?
And what does “go back on” mean?
This is a sentence from The Economist 20180811.
 
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  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To insist in is now rare = to argue strongly and persistently for or against something. It concerns only speech, and is followed (when it is used...) by the proposed course of action that a person constantly (and at every opportunity) espouses or supports.

    Winston Churchill insisted in going back on the gold standard in 1925-> Winston Churchill was insistent in his arguments/speeches in favour of going back on the gold standard in 1925

    It differs only slightly from "insist on" - to demand - which would be followed by some item or concept:

    "He insisted on cheese with every meal; He insisted on being late."
     

    Alazyguy

    Member
    Chinese
    To insist in is now rare = to argue strongly and persistently for or against something. It concerns only speech, and is followed (when it is used...) by the proposed course of action that a person constantly (and at every opportunity) espouses or supports.

    Winston Churchill insisted in going back on the gold standard in 1925-> Winston Churchill was insistent in his arguments/speeches in favour of going back on the gold standard in 1925

    It differs only slightly from "insist on" - to demand - which would be followed by some item or concept:

    "He insisted on cheese with every meal; He insisted on being late."
    Thanks. One more question.
    go back on means 'to fail to keep a promise',right? But clearly he made Britain return to the gold standard.Could you explain it?
     
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