inspect [for] bruises

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WildWest

Senior Member
Turkish
"By design, this transport is orchestrated so that consumers never have to think about a fruit's journey—until it arrives at the store, and they can inspect for bruises."

Hi, dear native speakers. The above sentence is taken from an old issue of National Geographic magazine. The article from which it was extracted is on the transportation of fruits and vegetables in the US. Two National Geographic reporters follow a truck filled with strawberries from a field in California to Washington D.C, and so on.

Here's my question: Should we assume that there is an elided "them" immediately after "inspect" referring to fruits and vegetables being transported? I know that verb is transitive, however, it doesn't necessarily have to have an object since it's clear from the passage. That's my guess, and I wonder whether I'm right in thinking this way. Thanks in advance.
 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    If an object had to be supplied, it would need to be 'it', not 'them', because the text refers to the journey of 'a fruit', singular.
    However, I am sure srk is right to see the meaning as 'make an inspection'.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thank you both for your replies. In my opinion, even if we assume inspect can be used only in transitive, leaving out the object makes the sentence sound better.
     

    WildWest

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thank you both for the further clarifications.

    If I constructed the same sentence myself, and add "them" after "inspect", would it have any negative effect on the flow of the sentence?

    From my perspective, I suppose so. Because as a non-native speaker, it doesn't sound very good to my ears with "them" added. In such cases, I think it depends on personal preferrence to include objects, as long as they can be understood clearly from the context.
     
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