Instead of by

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Pajarero

Member
Spanish - Spain
Hi everybody,
I don't know if the word 'instead' can be used in a sentence like this. It sounds a little weird for me 'instead of by'. Is it correct?:

"It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of an excessive consumption instead of by (the implementation of) (implementing) a mistaken policy".

Or should I put 'instead' at the end of the sentence?

It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of an excessive consumption or by the implementation of a mistaken policy instead.

I think that the first is more correct, but I'm not completely sure.

Thanks a lot!
 
  • henrylee100

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would use 'rather than' in this context
    scarcity is likely to result from excessive consumption rather than a misguided policy
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi Pajarero. The second sentence is correct but means something different from ... what the first sentence would mean if it was correct:eek:

    In your second sentence the two causes are equally possible.

    In It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of an excessive consumption instead of by rather than *** (the implementation of) implementing a mistaken policy, the first cause is more likely than the second.

    *** rather than as a result of is what I'd choose here, but I hope someone else might come up with a less cumbersome alternative:)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    "It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of ( ) excessive consumption rather than as a result of (the implementation of) (implementing) a mistaken policy".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Complex sentences like this require extra care. Here, it would help the reader to parallel the phrasing used for the two alternative causes: "consequence of an excessive consumption" and "of a mistaken policy": "It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption instead of a mistaken policy."

    You could also write:
    "a consequence of excessive consumption rather than of mistaken policies."
    "a consequence of excessive consumption as opposed to a mistaken policy."

    (Note that I omitted the article "an" for the "excessive consumption as this would be the usual phrasing.)

    The second sentence is confusing to me.
     

    Pajarero

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi Pajarero. The second sentence is correct but means something different from ... what the first sentence would mean if it was correct:eek:

    In your second sentence the two causes are equally possible.

    In It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of an excessive consumption instead of by rather than *** (the implementation of) implementing a mistaken policy, the first cause is more likely than the second.

    *** rather than as a result of is what I'd choose here, but I hope someone else might come up with a less cumbersome alternative:)
    I should realize that rather is a better option. Sometimes one choose the most complicated way!
    Ok, I suppose that the use of 'or' is the cause of the similar weight of the two alternatives, isn't it? I'd like that the first cause (the scarcity) is the most important, so I'm going to use 'rather than'.
    Thank you,
     
    Last edited:

    Pajarero

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Well, thanks to everybody, I think that the best (and the simplest) alternative could be:

    'It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption rather than of mistaken policies.'
    All the best,
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, thanks to everybody, I think that the best (and the simplest) alternative could be:

    'It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption rather than of mistaken policies.'
    All the best,
    I can't let you off that easily. The senetence doesn't seem right to me. 'as a consequence of' does not distribute so easily across the horns of a disjunction - in my view.



    'It is more likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption ( ) than of mistaken policies.'

    OR

    'It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption rather than as a consequence of mistaken policies.'
     

    Pajarero

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I am having difficulty in following the logic of Pajarero's distinction. Will the excessive consumption not be the consequence of a mistaken policy?
    Hi se16teddy, thanks for your answer.

    Well, in any sense you're right... Although this is a non-gramatical issue, isn't it?
    There is a very interesting debate among social scientists on whether favouring free markets is a 'policy' or, on the contrary, it would have to be seen as the outcome of the absence of intervention policies. In a sense, you can look at the excessive consumption as a result of the absence of any policy. In other words, the general context of the sentence is a comparation between the consequences of the impersonal working of free markets and the interventionist green policies. The lattest are the 'mistaken policies' (from the neoliberal and non-interventionist point of view). And the 'excessive consumption' would be the consequence of the lack of interventionist policies.

    I apologise for the speech.
    All best,
     

    Pajarero

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I can't let you off that easily. The senetence doesn't seem right to me. 'as a consequence of' does not distribute so easily across the horns of a disjunction - in my view.



    'It is more likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption ( ) than of mistaken policies.'

    OR

    'It is likely that scarcity will appear as a consequence of excessive consumption rather than as a consequence of mistaken policies.'
    Hi Beryl, surely you're right. Finally, I have chosen the second alternative.
    Thanks again for your help!
     
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