instructions: infinitive or imperative?

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HFASO

New Member
USA English
We have a discrepancy going around in our office. We are translating a 'how to' brochure from English to Spanish which contains instructions and menu options on how to access a telephone voice response system. The debate is, should these verbs (in bold below) be conjugated or not?

COMO OBTENER ACCESO SU CUENTA

Para tener acceso a su cuenta por telefono, llame al...

Para obtener acceso a su cuenta, usted debe:

-Entrar su numero de Seguro Social.
-Entrar su PIN.
-Seleccionar ya sea ingles o espanol.

Menu principal:
1-Cambie su PIN
2-Repetir
3-Transferir balances existentes

Sorry so long, but wanted you to get the picture. Thank you!!!!!!!!!!
 
  • cochagua

    Senior Member
    Spain/Spanish
    Yo creo que los infinitivos están bien, ya que siguen con la frase de "usted debe entrar, seleccionar".
    En cuanto a lo de "menu proncipal", si empieza conjugando, finalice conjugando, o si empieza con infinitivo, acabe con infinitivo, no mezclo los dos.
    Otra cosa, mejor que entrar yo utilizaría "introducir".
    Saludos
     

    Rayines

    Senior Member
    Castellano/Argentina
    cochagua says that Infinitives are right, since they follow the sentence "......usted debe:".

    In "Menú principal", (I say it with my words) it would be better to write every verb conjugated:
    1- Cambie su Pin
    2- Repita
    3- Transfiera b.e.
    or in infinitive:
    1-Cambiar su Pin
    2-Repetir
    3-Transferir b.e.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    cochagua said:
    Yo creo que los infinitivos están bien, ya que siguen con la frase de "usted debe entrar, seleccionar".
    En cuanto a lo de "menu proncipal", si empieza conjugando, finalice conjugando, o si empieza con infinitivo, acabe con infinitivo, no mezclo los dos.
    Otra cosa, mejor que entrar yo utilizaría "introducir".
    Saludos
    Here's what coch said:
    I think that the infinitives are good, because they follow the format of, "You should entrar, seleccionar". Regarding the "menu proncipal", if you begin conjugating, finish up conjugating, or if you begin with an infivitive, don't mix the two. Another thing, I'd rather use "introducir" as opposed to "entrar". Cheers!


    All: Didn't we debate this a long time ago? . . . Someone had asked this question regarding writing up an instruction manuel, I thought . . .
     

    cochagua

    Senior Member
    Spain/Spanish
    HFASO said:
    We have a discrepancy going around in our office. We are translating a 'how to' brochure from English to Spanish which contains instructions and menu options on how to access a telephone voice response system. The debate is, should these verbs (in bold below) be conjugated or not?

    COMO OBTENER ACCESO SU CUENTA

    Para tener acceso a su cuenta por telefono, llame al...

    Para obtener acceso a su cuenta, usted debe:

    -Entrar (I would use "introducir")su número del Seguro Social (Maybe "seguridad social"?).
    -Entrar (Introducir) su PIN.
    -Seleccionar ya sea inglés o español.

    Menu principal:
    1-Cambie Cambiar su PIN
    2-Repetir
    3-Transferir balances existentes

    Sorry so long, but wanted you to get the picture. Thank you!!!!!!!!!!
    So, if you use the infinitif, use it everywhere, or the other way round. But in the first part, "usted debe" (you must) must be followed by infinitif.

    Saludos
     

    mylam

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Para aclarar, el Seguro Social es el nombre que suele usar aquí en EEUU por el Social Security, un tipo de pensión que los ancianos reciben del gobierno.

    Just to clarify, "Seguro Social" is the name that is usually used here in the United States for Social Security, a type of pension that the elderly receive from the government.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    mylam said:
    Para aclarar, el Seguro Social es el nombre que suele usar aquí en EEUU por el Social Security, un tipo de pensión que los ancianos reciben del gobierno.

    Just to clarify, "Seguro Social" is the name that is usually used here in the United States for Social Security, a type of pension that the elderly receive from the government.
    But, I think that when speaking of an SSI number, you use seguridad, no?
     

    mylam

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Here in Texas I have always heard Seguro Social, never Seguridad. But then my hispanic friends aren't the most well-educated people in the world... :rolleyes: :D
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    mylam said:
    Here in Texas I have always heard Seguro Social, never Seguridad. But then my hispanic friends aren't the most well-educated people in the world... :rolleyes: :D
    I think, though, that when speaking of Social Security as the insurance/support for our citizens, you do use Seguro Social.

    But, in the word Social Security Number, you use Número Seguridad Social.

    I hope someone can confirm this! . . .


    I have, in the past, mistakenly taken the advice of my Spanish-speaking friends, too, only to find out that they were wrong. Go fig!
     

    mylam

    Senior Member
    United States English
    I've always heard número de Seguro Social.

    I just did a Google search, and found both versions in many places. But at www.segurosocial.gov (the Social Security Administration's official Spanish site), they use número de Seguro Social. So that must be the correct version here in the US.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    VenusEnvy said:
    But, in the word Social Security Number, you use Número Seguridad Social.
    Venus, you're right to draw the distinction between "security" and "insurance". However, in common practice, mylam is right on this one.

    When used as instructions, the infinitives are understood to be commands: "the next step is to enter your SSN". I agree with the others that you must either use infinitives or conjugate the verbs into formal commands...but not both.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    mylam said:
    I just did a Google search, and found both versions in many places.
    :(

    mylam said:
    But at www.segurosocial.gov (the Social Security Administration's official Spanish site), they use número de Seguro Social. So that must be the correct version here in the US.
    It must be! Thanks for looking into it, mylam!

    So, seguro is appropriate for both words. Ok! :thumbsup:

    EDIT: Thanks, fenix.
     

    rpleimann

    Senior Member
    USA English
    VenusEnvy said:
    I think, though, that when speaking of Social Security as the insurance/support for our citizens, you do use Seguro Social.

    But, in the word Social Security Number, you use Número Seguridad Social.

    I hope someone can confirm this! . . .


    According to the U.S. Government Social Security website, it is Seguro Social (for the program) and número de Seguro Social.

    :) rp
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Pedro P. Calvo Morcillo said:
    Here in Spain La Seguridad Social is a public institution, so we have our número de seguridad social. If we say seguro, we would refer to a private insurance.
    This is the logic that I was following, as I had heard this previously. I suppose it varies regionally? . . .
     
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