Intend on / intend to

LIKE-I-EVEN-CUUR

New Member
French
Hi everybody, i'm new here so i don't really know if i'm in the right place, but i guess i am. Anyway.:(
So i have a question, because i'm french but i had to do a leaflet for an english test and it was about outsourcing and stuffs like that.
So i wrote " [...] intended on relocating its factories." Because a friend from Canada told me "we say - to intend ON doing something." so, i thought it was good. But my teacher said :" No it's wrong we say to intend to do sth." :confused:
I know that intend to is correct but what about to intend on doing sth. I know lots of people say it, but i don't know if it's really correct.
Thanks for helping.:D
 
  • Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Welcome to the forum, Like-I-Even-Cuur.

    I can't tell you a definitive rule, but I would say "... intended on relocating" and "... intended to relocate." I would not say "... intended to relocating."
     

    curb05

    Member
    English - England
    I've never heard 'intend on' used in regular or formal correspondence before.

    Your best bet is to use 'intend to'.

    Hope this helps
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think the difference is between the verb and the gerund. With the verb, it is "intend to", and with the gerund, "intend on". "I intended on coming into work today" seems perfectly fine to me, as does "I intended to come into work today." It does not work either way in reverse: "intended to coming into" nor "intended on come into."
     

    curb05

    Member
    English - England
    I just looked at the Cambridge English dictionary online and there is no mention of 'intend on', which suggests that 'intend to' (which is in there) is the better choice for clarity.

    Hope this helps
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I just looked at the Cambridge English dictionary online and there is no mention of 'intend on', which suggests that 'intend to' (which is in there) is the better choice for clarity.

    Hope this helps

    Would you use this with a gerund, however? "The company intended to relocating its factories" sounds plainly wrong, to my ear.
     

    curb05

    Member
    English - England
    No, I'd say "the company intended to relocate its factories". I don't see any reason here to be using the gerund.

    Hope this answered your question.
     

    LIKE-I-EVEN-CUUR

    New Member
    French
    Yea it absolutely did, but my english teacher the one from school told me it was wrong, whereas, my other english teacher (from Toronto) told me to use it, so it's kind of confusing.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    No, I'd say "the company intended to relocate its factories". I don't see any reason here to be using the gerund.

    Hope this answered your question.

    I agree of course that you don't have to use it, but I'm not sure that this is helpful in answering the original question. :) If you were to use the gerund as a matter of personal choice (or if you were instructed to use it as part of an exercise as a student), would you use "to" or "on" (or something else)?
     

    curb05

    Member
    English - England
    Oh, I see what you meant now.

    Well, if I were asked to use a gerund I would use 'intend on', though I've personally never had to. I've always used 'intend to', and reserved using a 'infinitive + on' for phrases such as insist (I insist on making the dinner, for example, as 'insist to' would make no sense).

    Hope this answers your question.
     

    Gabbi

    Senior Member
    Irish
    Doing the obligatory google test "intend to" receives 25,900,000 results while "intend on" receives 781,000 results (not exactly insignificant though).

    A pretty good website for such conundrums is the "list of Errors" one (http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html#errors)

    I would almost say, Old Novice, that "intend on" is possibly more colloquial and perhaps more limited to AE rather than BE.
     

    curb05

    Member
    English - England
    LIKE-I-EVEN-CUUR,

    'To intent on doing something' would not be correct.

    You would either say 'to intend to do something' or 'to be intent on doing something'.

    To intend to do something means 'to have something in mind to do', while to 'be intent on doing something' means you are determined to do it.

    Hope this helps.
     

    Wertis

    Banned
    Russian
    First, I suggest we not use google or any other search engine when discussing grammar aspects. It's not reliable and can mislead all of us. Google shows what numerous Internet resources contain and how do we know whether or not people uploading that information are/were knowledgeable? Very often I come across pieces of information with the English which is of dubious quality or even worse.

    I would vote for "intend to do something". "Intend on doing something" is wrong because "to intend" and Gerund are incompatible in any context possible. "To be intent on doing something" or the same collocation with "upon" in place of "on" is correct. This phrase means to be determined to do something.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I thought it might be useful to quote the relevant entry from the site linked in Gabbi's post 15:
    INTEND ON
    INTEND
    You can plan on doing something, but you intend to do it. Many people confuse these two expressions with each other and mistakenly say “intend on.” Of course if you are really determined, you can be intent on doing something.
    I don't think that I've ever heard anyone say "intend on", myself....

    PS: That said, I happily say/write "intend + gerund" (without the "on").
     
    Last edited:

    panjandrum

    Senior Member
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I thought it might be useful to quote the relevant entry from the site linked in Gabbi's post 15:
    I don't think that I've ever heard anyone say "intend on", myself....

    PS: That said, I happily say/write "intend + gerund" (without the "on").
    I intend to invite Loob to my Christmas party.
    I intend inviting Loob to my Christmas party.
    I am intent on inviting Loob to my Christmas party.
    I intend on... most definitely not.

    If you want to check usage, you would be better looking at Google News, or at the various corpora listed in the sticky thread at the top of this forum.
    The corpora confirm that "intend on" is very much a minority usage and on that basis is best avoided.

    Google News, on the other hand, lists a considerable number of examples. Far too many for us to ignore.
    I wonder where "intend on" is considered correct?
     
    Last edited:

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The corpuses give a more reliable indication than Google.
    The American COCA and COHA have 28 and 4 examples respectively of intend on.
    Intend on
    does not appear in the British National Corpus.

    Conclusion: intend on is probably substandard or, at best, an unusual variant.
     

    Wertis

    Banned
    Russian
    Let's summarize now. So you (native-speakers) claim "intend on doing something" is possible? I was taught in the university that "intend to do something" is the only correct pattern with "to intend".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Let's summarize now. So you (native-speakers) claim "intend on doing something" is possible? I was taught in the university that "intend to do something" is the only correct pattern with "to intend".
    I'm afraid I don't understand your 'summary', Wertis:confused:.

    Nearly all of us are saying we don't use "intend on doing". And a website has been quoted which describes it as a common mistake.

    The fact that panj found a number of Google News hits for it indicates that may be considered correct in parts of the English-speaking world. But we haven't, as yet, identified where those parts might be.

    That said, "intend to do" is not the only correct pattern; "intend doing" is also standard English.
     

    Wertis

    Banned
    Russian
    Ok, I was not attentive enough. Still I'm surprised since I'm used to the pattern with infinitive and that with gerund seems alien to me. Anyway, I'll remember that it's also possible in English.
     

    Gabbi

    Senior Member
    Irish
    Nearly all of us are saying we don't use "intend on doing". And a website has been quoted which describes it as a common mistake.

    The problem lies in the axiom "common mistake" which implies that "intend on" is in "common use".

    And that is the beauty of the ever evolving English language.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The corpuses give a more reliable indication than Google.
    The American COCA and COHA have 28 and 4 examples respectively of intend on.
    Intend on does not appear in the British National Corpus.

    Conclusion: intend on is probably substandard or, at best, an unusual variant.

    In BE, at least. Notwithstanding the many votes to the contrary, as an AE speaker I've heard it with gerunds all my life. But I'm happy to learn not to use it when visiting London.
     

    panjandrum

    Senior Member
    English-Ireland (top end)
    OK, so we've covered the possibility of there being minority communities where "intend on" is an acceptable form.

    For LIKE-I-EVEN-CUUR, who clearly does, the message is simple, don't use "intend on".
     

    Basilvino

    New Member
    English
    The problem lies in the axiom "common mistake" which implies that "intend on" is in "common use".

    And that is the beauty of the ever evolving English language.

    I know that this is an old thread, and I apologize for the necromancy. I hear this in common use here in western Canada very often. It’s sickening. To me it’s on par with the misuse of Meantime (instead of In the meantime). And I believe this isn't an example of the beauty of the English language, but the ugliness of group ignorance. When enough people insist that wrong is right, we give in and let it be so.

    Anyways, if you simply look at the meanings of the words intend, on, and to, specifically on and to, it’s plain to see that there is no context in which intend on can be correct, common usage or no.
     
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