Intense sensations in food/gum

Messquito

Senior Member
Chinese - Taiwan 中文 Taiwanese Hokkien 臺語
How do you describe how these 5 types of food taste that borderlines pain in your language?

1. Hot chili (burning sensation in the tongue and throat)
hot, spicy
2. Wasabi (burning through your nose)
hot
3. Pepper (tickling through your nose)
hot
4. Airwaves gum or mint (freezing sensations through your nose)
refreshing, cool
5. coke, or soda (tingling feeling in your nose and throat)
refreshing, cool

In Chinese:

1. Hot chili (burning sensation in the tongue and throat)
hot, spicy
辣(a specific word for food, or as a slangy term for "hot", sexy people)
2. Wasabi (burning through your nose)
hot
嗆(choking, or irritating) or 嗆鼻(nose-tingling)
3. Pepper (tickling through your nose)
hot
嗆(same as 2.) or 嗆鼻(nose-tingling)
4. Airwaves gum or mint (freezing sensations through your nose)
refreshing, cool
嗆(same as 2. and 3.)
5. coke, or soda (tingling feeling in your nose and throat)
嗆(same as 2. through 4.)

In general, 辣 refers to the red-hot burning sensation, while 嗆, refers to the sensation of the respiratory tract being "opened up(打通)" or one making you want to sneeze or cough or simply let out a big sigh.
 
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  • apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    1. Adj. «καυτερός, -ρή, -ρό» [kaf.teˈɾɔs] (masc.), [kaf.teˈɾi] (fem.), [kaf.teˈɾɔ] (neut.) --> hot, spicy < Byz. Gr. adj. «καυτερός» kau̯terós (idem) < Classical deverbative 3rd declension masc. «καυτήρ» kau̯tḗr (nom. sing.), «καυτῆρος» kau̯têrŏs (gen. sing) --> cauterizing apparatus < Classical v. «καίω» kaí̯ō --> to kindle, set on fire, burn (possibly from PIE *keh₂u- to burn and with possible cognates the Lith. kūlës, firewood, Persian سو‎ (su), light).

    2. Idem

    3. «Καυτερή πιπεριά» [kaf.teˈɾi pi.perˈʝa] (both fem.).

    4. Adj. «δροσερός, -ρή, -ρό» [ðrɔ.seˈɾɔs] (masc.), [ðrɔ.seˈɾi] (fem.), [ðrɔ.seˈɾɔ] (neut.) --> cool, dewy, refreshing < Classical adj. «δροσερός» drŏsĕrós (idem) < Classical masc. noun «δρόσος» drósŏs --> dew (possibly Pre-Greek).

    5. The most common adjective is the deverbative «τσουχτερός, -ρή, -ρό» [ʦ͜ux.teˈɾɔs] (masc.), [ʦ͜ux.teˈɾi] (fem.), [ʦ͜ux.teˈɾɔ] (neut.) --> tingling, stinging < MoGr v. «τσούζω» [ˈʦ͜u.zɔ] --> to sting, burn < Classical v. «σίζω» sízō --> to hiss (Onomatopoeic, just like Lat. sibilō).
     
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