interest in applying the knowledge and skills set acquired

marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would like to please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
The attendance and the study of these modules have aroused her interest in applying the knowledge and skills set acquired to the financial market analysis.
 
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  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    What does "The attendance and the study of these module" mean? What is an attendance of modules?

    Can you express the whole idea more simply?
     

    stcopy

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I think he means 'after taking those modules", so I think just use 'those modules' to replace all of them 'The attendance and the study of these modules'.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You're probably right. "The modules have aroused her interest in applying the acquired knowledge and skills set to the financial market analysis." However, this does not mean that she has actually done anything, merely that her interest in perhaps doing something has been aroused. I am not sure that this is what the OP meant.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I'd prefer acquired to come after knowledge and skills set (shouldn't it be skill set? -- a set of skills but a skill set; a box of matches but a match box -- better to leave skills in the plural but drop set), I'd also prefer to see something after acquired that says where or how they were were acquired.

    Her attendance at these course modules aroused her interest in applying the knowledge and skills she acquired during her studies to FMA.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    What does "The attendance and the study of these module" mean? What is an attendance of modules?

    Can you express the whole idea more simply?
    I think he means 'after taking those modules", so I think just use 'those modules' to replace all of them 'The attendance and the study of these modules'.
    I'd prefer acquired to come after knowledge and skills set (shouldn't it be skill set? -- a set of skills but a skill set; a box of matches but a match box -- better to leave skills in the plural but drop set), I'd also prefer to see something after acquired that says where or how they were were acquired.

    Her attendance at these course modules aroused her interest in applying the knowledge and skills she acquired during her studies to FMA.
    Greetings all

    A wonderful exemplification of the meaninglessness of the word "module".

    Σ
    Thanks, PaulQ, stcopy, Edinburgher, Scholiast.
    To PaulQ: Yes, with attendance, I meant the fact she attended university course modules.
    To Edinburgher: what about the following modifications to your suggested sentence: Her attendance at and study of these course modules aroused her interest in applying the knowledge and skills she acquired during her degree to FMA. Why do you suggest dropping set (you are right about the singular form skill)?
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    You mean why do I suggest dropping set? For one thing, I think "skill set" is a horrible jargon term, but also the skills (in the set) are what you apply, you don't apply the set as such.
    The degree is what you get at the end of the course, when you graduate. It's an instantaneous event that does not have duration. She didn't acquire knowledge and skills during the degree, but during the course.
    Frankly, you could easily omit much of the beginning of the sentence, and just say "These modules aroused ... during her degree course."
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You mean why do I suggest dropping set? For one thing, I think "skill set" is a horrible jargon term, but also the skills (in the set) are what you apply, you don't apply the set as such.
    The degree is what you get at the end of the course, when you graduate. It's an instantaneous event that does not have duration. She didn't acquire knowledge and skills during the degree, but during the course.
    Frankly, you could easily omit much of the beginning of the sentence, and just say "These modules aroused ... during her degree course."
    Thanks, Edinburgher, for your suggestions. And from a grammatical point of view, should the first part be: Her (or The) attendance at, and study of, these modules ...?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The grammar is fine, and it doesn't matter whether you begin with her or the (I find her a little better) or whether you keep or omit the two commas (I prefer them left in).
    But, believe it or not, there are more important things in life than grammar! :eek: (Don't tell anyone I said that)
    I don't know why you are so keen to keep all this attendance and study stuff, unless you are translating something and want to make sure every word in the source text is featured in the translated material. Sometimes it's better not to be quite so literal.
    Even the phrase "aroused her interest in applying" sounds stilted. Keep it simple: How about "inspired her to apply"? And think about what really inspired her. It's not the fact that she attended and studied, it's what she studied. Isn't that right?
     
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