internment vs exile

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marcinnek

Senior Member
czech
hello, I have a question: is internment the same as exile? I want to write about two people who had to stay in a particular country. I´m not sure whether they were forced to stay exactly there or whether they stayed there because they had nowhere better to go, if it´s clear what I mean.
Thank you in advance
Adela
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, exile is sending someone out of the country. We do talk about 'internal exile', as when someone is sent to a faraway part of the country, such as Siberia. That would normally be internment too, but it's not the ordinary meaning of 'exile'.

    Internment is a government action. It's similar to imprisonment. It may include all 'enemy aliens', for example Germans during the Second World War in an Allied country, even though the government recognizes that many of the interned Germans are friendly, not spies, possibly anti-Nazi, and so on, but it has to intern them to be safe.
     

    marcinnek

    Senior Member
    czech
    No, exile is sending someone out of the country. We do talk about 'internal exile', as when someone is sent to a faraway part of the country, such as Siberia. That would normally be internment too, but it's not the ordinary meaning of 'exile'.

    Internment is a government action. It's similar to imprisonment. It may include all 'enemy aliens', for example Germans during the Second World War in an Allied country, even though the government recognizes that many of the interned Germans are friendly, not spies, possibly anti-Nazi, and so on, but it has to intern them to be safe.
    OK, thank you. I will use EXILE then.
    Adela
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Entangled has this right.

    Yesterday was a righteously deplorable anniversary in the USA.

    We (in the USA) just passed the anniversary of the infamous Executive Order 9066 (February 19th, 1942) where all Japanese on US soil were to be placed in internment camps. Your question seems very timely.

    Executive Order 9066 - Wikipedia

    By almost any standard this is a black day in American history. But probably done to appease the public about the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and perhaps the safety of the Japanese from other Americans acting in mobs was a consideration. But in as much as only one hour of debate was devoted to the subject I suspect it was more of the first and less of the second consideration.
     

    Retired-teacher

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Exile" would only be correct if they were forced to remain outside their own country by some authority. If they voluntarily stayed there because they had no where better to go then the word is not appropriate.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Exile" would only be correct if they were forced to remain outside their own country by some authority. If they voluntarily stayed there because they had no where better to go then the word is not appropriate.
    I suppose you could be "exiled from your own home" if your family felt you did something truly egregious. It would be a metaphor in that case, but I could see it being used.

    Wiki suggests "voluntary exile" and gives as an example Jews fleeing persecution from their homeland in Germany.

    Exile - Wikipedia

     
    We (in the USA) just passed the anniversary of the infamous Executive Order 9066 (February 19th, 1942) where all Japanese on US soil were to be placed in internment camps.
    This is not correct. "All Japanese on US soil" were not interned. Those interned were persons of Japanese ancestry (including persons born in the US, and thus US citizens from birth) who were living in the state of California, the western parts of Oregon and Washington, and the southwestern part of Arizona, after March of 1942. Persons of Japanese ancestry who had moved to or who lived in other parts of the US, or other US territories (including the Territory of Hawaii, where most "Japanese on US soil" lived) were not generally interned.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    This is not correct. "All Japanese on US soil" were not interned. Those interned were persons of Japanese ancestry (including persons born in the US, and thus US citizens from birth) who were living in the state of California, the western parts of Oregon and Washington, and the southwestern part of Arizona, after March of 1942. Persons of Japanese ancestry who had moved to or who lived in other parts of the US, or other US territories (including the Territory of Hawaii, where most "Japanese on US soil" lived) were not generally interned.
    I stand corrected.

    I got the date right though.:oops:
     
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