Interpreter services are given in sign language, legal, tact

TerryWang

Senior Member
Taiwan
Dear all,

I need some help. Please see below:

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Interpreter services are given in sign language,
legal, tactile and intermediary.


The last sentence really confuses me. What is "legal, tactile and intermediary"? I don't get this sentence structure. Could anyone explain what it means?

Millions of thanks,
Terry
 
  • saladfingers

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would guess that "legal, tactile and intermediary" are different types of sign language, and all 3 are offered by the interpreters.


    EDIT: looking at it again, I realise they are probably types of interpreting services, rather than sign language!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I don't believe these are mutually exclusive terms.

    Legal - probably a specialist legal interpretation service.
    Tactile - for deaf/blind people.
    Intermediary - a person to be there as an interpreter.
     

    TerryWang

    Senior Member
    Taiwan
    Thank you, and one more question: Do all these types of interpreting services have to do with sign language?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    It appears to be so, but the sentence would have been clearer with a colon after "sign language".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I suppose it depends on your definition of "sign language".
    As I understand it, sign language would be fine for deaf people, but pretty useless for the deaf/blind.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    I suppose it depends on your definition of "sign language".
    As I understand it, sign language would be fine for deaf people, but pretty useless for the deaf/blind.
    Not so. See the brief discussion of Tactile Sign Language in Ethnologue here.
    <<Tactile Sign Language is used by over 900 persons in Louisiana who know ASL, but have lost their sight from a generic cause: Usher's Syndrome. They communicate by touch on each other's wrists.>>

    Addition: Tactile Sign Language is a dialect of American Sign Language. I have also found references to Tactile French Sign Language and to Tactile British Sign Language. The latter is mentioned here, for example.
     
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