into(in to) the\a home

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yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! Could one say
- I came in to the home.
- I came into a home...
-I came in to someone's home.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In all of those, into would normally be one word. But you might like to tell us the context you have in mind? As you know, come and go are used in different circumstances. ;)
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    As you know, come and go are used in different circumstances. ;)
    Yes, of course.
    1)I say it, for instance, to the person that was in the home, when I came in.
    -I came into the (your) home when you had a lunch.
    Is it correct to say it in this case? Or I should say, even in this case
    -I went into your home when you had a lunch. OR
    -I entered the home when you was at home and have a lunch.
    Also, is it correct to put the article "the" before "home" in this sentence?(at home, for instance, is written without any article)
    2) I'm in the same home inside when saying "I came into the home through the door five minutes ago."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I came/went into your home can use either verb, because the statement can be meant from either the listener’s point of view or the speaker’s, depending on the context.

    It’s not just come and go that makes a difference, but whether the destination is perceived as here or there.

    Which article you might use with the word “home” seems irrelevant to this concept.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    But in my cases when I say it, I'm in the same home where I came in some time ago. So, is it necessary to say "came"?
    Is it possible to use the article 'the" before "home" at all?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you are in someone else’s home and talking about a previous time when you were there, then of course you would use come, since the place you’re referring to is where you are. It’s here to both you and the person you’re addressing — assuming he’s with you at the time (although you’d still use come if he wasn’t).

    And yes, of course you can say “the home” if you’re talking about a certain home. But it has to make sense in the context in which you use it.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It’s here to both you and the person you’re addressing — assuming he’s with you at the time (although you’d still use come if he wasn’t).
    Ok. But can I say it if I am not in this home where I was in previous time, while saying this sentence, but the person is at home there. (we are speaking by phone with him)
    -Do you remember when I came into your home. you had a lunch?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. You’re somewhere else, but you’re referring to where your interlocutor is, looking at it from his perspective. “Your home” is here to the person you’re speaking to.

    Do you remember when I came to where you are now? :tick:
    Do you remember when I went to where you are now? :cross:
    Do you remember when I went straight from the airport to where you are now? :tick:
    (Here the perspective can be switched from the destination to the departure point)
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I went into the room (dynamic verb). I was in the room (stative verb).
    Please, read my question one more. It is not I asked about.))
    I mean only "in" and "into" for "came" and "went" (come and go). Of course, not for the stative ones.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You use whichever preposition fits what you’re saying. Of course you can say come in and go in, but they don’t usually mean the same as come or go into, which requires an object.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Non-standard perhaps, informal, but extremely common. In fact, a very quick google suggests that “came in the room” is more common than “came into the room”.
     
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