into that familiar half-grin

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AzahAzah

Senior Member
India - Hindi
"Well, Mr Carl, your mother has imformed me that you're a hell of rugby player," Dr Rhys says. "Played myself a few yesrs ago".

Scott's eyes light up and his mouth wrinkles into that familiar half-grin."

I cannot understand the meaning of "..... wrinkles into that familiar half-grin". It seems to me that "familiar" is acting as a verb here. But I'm not sure. To be sure I searched dictionary to know about. Dictionary shows that "familiar" works as adjective. But still I think that this sentence means that his mouth wrinkles in such a way that people will find him as half-grin.

Please say what you think.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ' . . . that familiar half-grin' means the half-grin that people have seen before, and are familiar with.

    'To familiarise' is the verb you may be thinking about.
     

    AzahAzah

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    ' . . . that familiar half-grin' means the half-grin that people have seen before, and are familiar with.

    'To familiarise' is the verb you may be thinking about.
    Would you like to explain it a littele bit more? It would be better if you tell me the meaning of whole sentence and express it with other ways, i.e I request you to rewrite the last sentence containing "familiar half-grin".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    He often smiles in a particular way that might be called a "half-grin". People are aware of this and used to the way that he smiles. They are familiar with his half-grin. His half-grin is familiar. It is his familiar half-grin.
     
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