Intrusion VS invasion

Nawee

Senior Member
Thai
Hello,

I'm a little confused between "intrusion" and "invasion". I know that 'when one country enters another country by force', it's definitely "an invasion". I'm not so sure which to use with these 2 cases.

1. Privacy: I have seen both "intrusion to privacy" and "invasion to privacy" and there seems to be some differences between the two terms, in legal language at least. But what do people actually use, for example, to describe the scenario in which the government monitoring people's online activities or calls?

2. Home: When there's a break-in, is it an intrusion or invasion?

Thank you.

N.
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We usually say "invasion of privacy" and "home invasion." "Intrusion" is vaguer and tends to be less common, but it is the word of choice in certain medical contexts: the intrusion of the disc into the etc.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hello,

    I'm a little confused between "intrusion" and "invasion". I know that 'when one country enters another country by force', it's definitely "an invasion". I'm not so sure which to use with these 2 cases.

    1. Privacy: I have seen both "intrusion to privacy" and "invasion to privacy" and there seems to be some differences between the two terms, in legal language at least. But what do people actually use, for example, to describe the scenario in which the government monitoring people's online activities or calls?

    2. Home: When there's a break-in, is it an intrusion or invasion?

    Thank you.

    N.
    In general, I see "intrusion" as a less serious or violent thing than an "invasion".

    1. I think "invasion of privacy" is a more common term, as The Newt points out. In terms of the law, "intrusion" implies that someone violated your privacy; but an "invasion" is when that intrusion causes you harm personally.

    2. "Home invasion" is generally a set phrase used to describe a particular kind of break-in - one where the perpetrator(s) break in to a home, but with violent intents. These crimes almost always involve more than just breaking-in, or burglary. Also, an "intruder" can "intrude" for various reasons of seriousness. An uninvited guest at a party could be an intruder, just as someone who breaks a window and enters a home in the middle of the night.
     
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