Involuntary circumstance arises

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valefor

Member
India (Hindi)
Hey all, is this sentence correct?

"I'll be there by 17th but give me time till next month incase involuntary circumstances arise"

^^ Is the above sentence grammatically correct?

Hoping to get a quick response.

Thanks :)
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    It should be "by the 17th". "In case" is two words (unless you just made a typo). "involuntary circumstances" isn't correct. Last, but not least, it makes no sense to say that you'll be there by a certain date but then go on to say to give "me time till next month". I have no idea what that means.
     

    valefor

    Member
    India (Hindi)
    Ok .. after the correction:

    "I'll try to be there by the 17th of this month, but give me time till next month incase involuntary circumstances arise."

    Now is it correct?

    Why is "involuntary circumstances" incorrect here? (I mean, I just want to know for knowledge's sake). Do you have something better to replace it?

    Like I simply want to say that give me extra time just incase I get busy with other things or something bad or whatever happens all of a sudden.

    Thanks!
     

    Pticru

    Senior Member
    U.S.-- English
    I think the expression you are looking for is: "in case unforseen circumstances arise", which would of course be "involuntary" on your part, but that is implied. And "in case" is indeed two separate words. Hope this helps.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "I'll try to be there by the 17th of this month, but give me time till next month incase in case involuntary circumstances arise."

    Why is "involuntary circumstances" incorrect here? (I mean, I just want to know for knowledge's sake). Do you have something better to replace it?

    Like I simply want to say that give me extra time just incase I get busy with other things or something bad or whatever happens all of a sudden.

    Thanks!
    Circumstances cannot be involuntary. They can be unforeseen or unavoidable but not involuntary. You're simply using the wrong word. When in doubt, try changing it. Have you ever heard of "voluntary circumstances"? Doesn't make sense, does it? People do things voluntarily and involuntarily, not circumstances.

    I still don't understand the part about "give me time till next month". You've said that you'll be there by the 17th of this month but then you turn around and say "but give me time till next month". Here's what you likely want to say:

    "I'll try to be there by the 17th of this month but if something arises that I hadn't anticipated, please give me until next month"
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English

    Pticru

    Senior Member
    U.S.-- English
    ^^ OK Thanks a lot.

    Actually I usually search the whole phrase before posting.

    Like I googled for: http://www.google.co.in/search?q=%22involuntary+circumstances%22&hl=en&start=10&sa=N and I found many results so I thought such a phrase exist.

    Thanks again for correction though. :)
    Just to reassure you, the phrase can actually exist, it's just that it has a slightly different meaning than the one you are intending here. "Involuntary circumstances" would indeed mean something out of your control, but it is lacking the added element of time/future, so a better word here would be "unforeseen", which implies already that it is out of your control, but additionally implies that you cannot predict it in advance.
     
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