'involve' without or with a preposition

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aleksch

New Member
polish
I have found sentences:

This expedition involves a great risk.
His new job involves more responsibility than the old one.
Can I use the preposition 'with' in above sentences?

This expedition involves WITH a great risk.
His new job involves WITH more responsibility than the old one.
 
  • much_rice

    Senior Member
    English - American
    No, "involve" can't take "with" in these circumstances. It does take "with" in some passive constructions:

    "To be involved with (someone)" usually means you have a romantic or sexual relationship with them, and occasionally can mean some other relationship.

    When I last saw Tammy she was involved with Tim, but now I see she's going on dates with Nick.

    "To be involved with (something)" means to do work in that field, or with that group.

    Tim has been involved with charitable organizations ever since Tammy broke up with him.
     

    aleksch

    New Member
    polish
    Ohhhhh ok, now I understand, thx !


    No, "involve" can't take "with" in these circumstances. It does take "with" in some passive constructions:

    "To be involved with (someone)" usually means you have a romantic or sexual relationship with them, and occasionally can mean some other relationship.

    When I last saw Tammy she was involved with Tim, but now I see she's going on dates with Nick.

    "To be involved with (something)" means to do work in that field, or with that group.

    Tim has been involved with charitable organizations ever since Tammy broke up with him.
     
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