Ipso ito dito

Maja2021

New Member
Serbian
Hi, is there anyone who could help me with this sentence? The only translation I could find is: "Tell him that", but I think it means something like "I told you so".
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings, and welcome to the Latin Forum.

    I regret to say that ipso ito dito makes no sense at all in Latin, though I suppose you might find something of the kind in a casually scribbled grafito on a wall in Pompeii.

    Could you give some indication, please, of the context in which you have come across this utterance?

    Σ
     

    Maja2021

    New Member
    Serbian
    Greetings, and welcome to the Latin Forum.

    I regret to say that ipso ito dito makes no sense at all in Latin, though I suppose you might find something of the kind in a casually scribbled grafito on a wall in Pompeii.

    Could you give some indication, please, of the context in which you have come across this utterance?

    Σ
    Hello, Scholiast,
    well, I found it in the book titled "Max" of the German author Markus Orths. The lady enters an office, looking for her brother, who is working there, and she says that she is the sister of ... A little later, after short conversation, the man, who is working there, concludes: "So, you are the sister of ....", and she answers: "Ipso ito dito". That's why I thought it ment something like: "So I said."
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Hello
    Since the author is German, perhaps it can be mentioned that ''dito'' is often used in German to indicate a repetition (= idem). So it can probably mean ''as was said''. But I have no idea about the meaning of ''ipso ito'' - although ''ipso'' could be an alteration of ''ipse'' (= himself).
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete de nouo!

    In a work of fiction, it is perfectly possible that the author intends to make his character speak pretentiously, but incorrectly, in pseudo-'Latin'. But I suspect that the mistake(s) is/are the author's own. Better would have been 'ita ut dixi', or 'ipsa dixi'.

    And bearded: is the word not 'ditto' with double 't'?

    Σ
     

    Maja2021

    New Member
    Serbian
    Thank you both very much! Scholiast, I think you are right. Both are possible, so I shall leave it as it is, without explanation in the footnote.
     
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