Ir a toda hostia

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The cub

Senior Member
Spanish
Greetings:)

When we do something "a toda hostia" we mean that we do it very fast/quickly. Here's an example:

(Two people on the road trying to get on time to a wedding)
Speaker A: -¿Cómo vamos a llegar a tiempo si la ceremonia empieza dentro de 10 minutos y estamos a 1000 putas millas de la capilla?
Speaker B: - Tú déjame a mí, que yo conduzco a toda hostia.

Bear in mind that "a toda hostia" is an informal expression, and the word "hostia" is a swearword. So, I'm not sure if "flat out" is as informal as "a toda hostia", or if I should employ a stronger construction.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.
 
  • Cerros de Úbeda

    Banned
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    Yes. That would be an obvious choice. I wanted to avoid the "fucking" thing for that reason.
    Bueno, si son obvios o no, es una opinión muy subjetiva... En mi opinión, 'obvia' de por sí.

    Quiero decir que si son unas expresiones muy comunes, eso no significa que sean 'obvias'.

    Por cierto, que son típicas del BE, no tanto del inglés americano.

    I think I could also say "I drive pretty damn fast" or "I drive fast as hell"
    Estas son más del inglés americano que del BE.

    In the specific context of driving and similar things, I've always been fond of "like a bat out of hell."
    Yes. That's a good one. Quite expressive, too.

    Although it misses some of the 'spice' of the vulgarism in 'de la hostia'...

    But you can't have everything, I guess; it's either 'hostias', or 'bats'. :)
     
    Last edited:

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    Bear in mind that "a toda hostia" is an informal expression, and the word "hostia" is a swearword. So, I'm not sure if "flat out" is as informal as "a toda hostia", or if I should employ a stronger construction.
    If you want something that sounds like you are swearing, then "balls out" is a great expression.

    "Leave it to me - I'll drive balls out."

    Some think it refers to testicular fortitude being displayed, others believe it derives from the era of how governors worked on steam engines, either way it sounds suitably rude.
     

    The cub

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "Going balls to the wall"
    This sounds a bit suicidal (which is nice in this context), as if Speaker B was about to smash him (and his balls) into a wall for his reckless driving. So, Speaker B should be scared as hell (which is the feeling I'd have if someone told me "tranquilo que yo conduzco a toda hostia")
     

    The cub

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Did I miss something? Is your target audience British or American? That'd help us give you better answers
    Well. My only target is native speakers, regardless the country. The point is that "very fast" or "really fast" would mean the same but the register would be quite different. "A toda hostia" is vulgar and "hostia" is a swearword, so "naughty";) vocabulary is essential here.
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    My only target is native speakers, regardless the country.
    But colloquial (and vulgar) expressions vary a lot from one country to another. So it may be difficult to find a single one that is universal. (For example, the use of "hostia" sounds very Spanish to me.)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    (Two people on the road trying to get on time to a wedding)
    Speaker A: -¿Cómo vamos a llegar a tiempo si la ceremonia empieza dentro de 10 minutos y estamos a 1000 putas millas de la capilla?
    Speaker B: - Tú déjame a mí, que yo conduzco a toda hostia.
    Is B saying that he/she generally drives "a toda hostia", or that he/she will do so on this occasion?
     
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