Irish Gaelic: date format

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jleishan

New Member
english - UNITED STATES
[Moderator's Note: This thread is moved from the English Only forum]
Does anyone know how get the written form of dates in Irish(Gaelic)?

For example:

March 14th, 2009
 
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  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Assuming you want to know how to do it in general, you can use google Translate for this kind of simple translation
     

    jleishan

    New Member
    english - UNITED STATES
    I tried that, but when I researched it a bit more I realized there was more to writing dates in Irish then simple translation. For example in Scottish Gaelic that date is written as:
    An ceathramh deug dhen mhart
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    'An ceathramh deug dhen Mhart' simply means 'the 14th of March' (nothing about 2009). Dates in Gaelic are the same as in English, just with the words translated.
     
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    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Note that there are hardly any Gaelic speakers (Irish or Scottish) who don't also speak English and write dates using mostly numerals. I can't really imagine why someone would take "14th March 2009" and not retain the numerals when translating it into Gaelic. It would be 14 Márta 2009, incidentally.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    If you wanted to also translate the "th" from "14th" into Irish then that would be "14ú".
     

    utopia

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    If I'm not mistaken, the right form in Irish gaelic should be "an 14ú lá"

    (that is "an ceatharú lá déag")
     
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