Irish Gaelic: go n-éirí an bóthar leat

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  • L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hello uchi.m,
    Welcome to "other languages". I was surprised we hadn't touched on this before in this forum.

    It's part of an Irish blessing (Beannacht Ghaelach) :
    Go n-éirí an bóthar leat
    Go raibh an ghaoth go brách ag do chúl
    Go lonraí an ghrian go te ar d'aghaidh
    Go dtite an bháisteach go mín ar do pháirceanna
    Agus go mbuailimid le chéile arís,
    Go gcoinní Dia i mbos A láimhe thú.
    Note that "Go n-éirí" in the context of this blessing is an idiom meaning "to succeed".
    So it's something like :

    May you have a sucessful journey.
    May the wind be always at your back.
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    the rain fall soft upon your fields. And until we meet again,
    may God hold you in the palm of his hand.


    Source
     

    Fericire

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    Hello uchi.m,
    Welcome to "other languages". I was surprised we hadn't touched on this before in this forum.

    It's part of an Irish blessing (Beannacht Ghaelach) :


    Note that "Go n-éirí" in the context of this blessing is an idiom meaning "to succeed".
    So it's something like :

    May you have a sucessful journey.
    May the wind be always at your back.
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    the rain fall soft upon your fields. And until we meet again,
    may God hold you in the palm of his hand.


    Source
    I really have to thank you.
    We were (are?) discussing this on http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2326181. Your post has helped me a lot. :)
     

    elirlandes

    Senior Member
    Ireland English
    As L'Irlandais says, the basis of the phrase is the phrasal verb "éirigh le" which means to succeed.
    [éirigh = rise, le = with] but [éirigh le = to succeed].

    While "Go n-éirí an bóthar leat" is part of a typical blessing or toast, the phrase itself is often used simple to mean "Good luck!"
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Hi Pedro,
    Your prefered translation is the widely accepted one. :thumbsup: Just that as a cyclist, I've always thought it odd that the road continually rising before you could be a blessing.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Hi Pedro,
    Your prefered translation is the widely accepted one. :thumbsup: Just that as a cyclist, I've always thought it odd that the road continually rising before you could be a blessing.
    It depends on how cheesy you want to be in your translation :D This is also widely used to mean "good luck" in a non-greeting-card context. If you take a new job, your old colleague might tell you "go n-éirí an bóthar leat" which is a completely normal way of saying good luck. In this case, he is not trying to be poetic and you wouldn't translate it with "may the road rise up etc" :D If you see it in a greeting card or a prayer though, it is ok to translate it as "may the road etc".
     
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