Irish Gaelic: three things to be aware of: the hoof of a horse, the horn of a bull, and the smile of an Englishman.

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Hello folks!
Does anyone happen to know how this refrain, that is often found at the end of old Irish tales, "There are three things to be aware of: the hoof of a horse, the horn of a bull, and the smile of an Englishman" sounded in Gaelic?

Or did it? Perhaps, it is wiser to just translate it anew?
 
  • CapnPrep

    Senior Member
    AmE
    I'm not sure how old or traditional this proverb is, but see here:
    An trí rud is dainséaraí amuigh: éadan tairbh, deireadh staile, gáire an tSasanaigh.
    The three most dangerous things there are: the front of a bull, the back of a stallion, the laugh of an Englishman.
    And in M. Tymoczko, The Irish Ulysses (p. 281):
    Seachain gáire sacsanach, éadan tairbh, dranntadh madaidh, agus deireadh staile. ["Shun the smile of the Saxon, the bull's forehead, the snarling of a dog, and the hind-part of a stallion."]
     
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