Irish: Spoken in Europe 2000 years ago

Ruaidhrí

New Member
Ireland/Irish/English
Hello.


I would be very interested to hear from anybody who might be interested in the links between modern Irish (Gaelic) and ancient Celtic. It is a fascinating (at least for me!) subject.

I really don't think that Irish people realise that their language was actually spoken all over Europe a couple of thousand years ago.
Any insights would be welcome.

Míile buíochas

Ruaidhrí
 
  • utopia

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    Hi Ruaidhrí,

    Yes, Celtic languages were spoken back then all over Europe, but it's not exactly what Irish Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Breton Cornish and Manx are today.

    I think that the issue of old languages IS intriguing, especially when their remnants are still spoken, it's like a voice carrying on through history.

    Just curious, ce acu canuint is fearr leatsa, a Ruaidhrí ?

    le meas :D
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Hi Utopia.

    Of course you are absolutely right. Gaulish is not Gaeilge. And Gaulish etc. had no initial mutations. But the numberof lexical similarities is a bit mind blowing. Especially for someone who grew up thinking that Irish was something totally non European, something that separated us rather than made us part of the bigger picture.

    Like, for instance, how Caesar's old friend 'Dumnorix' translates as 'Domhanrí' in modern Irish. And more fascinating still, there is a character in the Fiannaíocht cycle - which is still alive in Ireland - who is called Rí an Domhain!

    Maidir le canúintí - is fearr liom Gaeilge Chonamara. Cá bhfuair tusa do chuid Gaeilge?
     

    utopia

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    Is as Iosrael me, mura dtomhais tu e, agus is as leabhair mo chuid Gaeilge.

    Ach ba go hairithe mac leinn teangeolaiocht me, toisc go raibh suim agam ar teangacha. Is Gaeilge ata suim is mo agam faoi lathair.

    Canuint thuaisceart na hEireann (Tir Chonaill) is fearr liomsa.

    :eek:
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Bhuel, thomhais, cineál - léigh mé do phróifíl!
    Gaeilge Thir Chonaill, an ea? Is as Dún na nGall (Leitir Ceanainn) mo bhean chéile - as Anagaire i nGaeltacht Thír Chonaill a máthair siúd. Céard a mhúscail do spéis sa Ghaeilge? Feicim ó do chuid iontrálachaí eile gur duine ilteangach thú. Cén fath a bhfuil tú ag díriú ar an nGaeilge faoi lathair?
     

    utopia

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    Is leabhar faoi Eireann a mhuscail mo speis sa Ghaeilge.

    Duirt me gur mac leinn teangeolaiochta ata ionam. Agus fos, nil a fhios agamsa cad e a mhuscail mo speis i dteangacha ar fad mar ?discipline? .

    Ta speis mor agam i dteangacha Ceilteacha, is feidir toisc gur ?seanda? (ancient) na teangacha siud.
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Bhuel tá togha na Gaeilge agat, féarplé duit. Is fíor duit maidir le seandacht na dteangacha Ceilteacha. Faraor nach bhfuil a fhios ag níos mó daoine fúthu - go háirithe muintir na hÉireann!
     

    Roi Marphille

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan.
    :) wow!!!

    Even I don't understand a bit, it is exciting to read this language and to know that it is still spoken.
    I remember when I went to West Ireland and two guys were speaking Gaelic in a bar. I felt a big emotion!
    Hope all "small" languages remain in this globalised World.

    Regards,

    Roi
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    I'm very interested in learning Gaelic...but they say it's no longer spoken in Ireland, it's a pitty really because it is a marvelous language. I'm taking my first steps in Gailge through some course on the BBC.

    Slán :)
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Thank you for your comments Roi and Artrella. Yes Irish is still spoken in Ireland, although the language is under intense pressure from English. The language is spoken in Irish speaking districts called Gaeltachtaí - these are few and shrinking. There is also a small but significant number of people who speak Irish in the larger towns and cities.

    One phenomenon which is of interest is the growth in the demand for Irish speaking primary schools. These are growing at an amazing rate and seem to suggest an improvement in the way the language is perceived by the people.

    The arrival of an Irish language television station (TG4) has been a major boost to the language. However the power of English is great - Most minority languages find themselves in similar situations, I suppose.

    Míle buíochas

    Ruaidhrí
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Ruaidhrí said:
    Especially for someone who grew up thinking that Irish was something totally non European, something that separated us rather than made us part of the bigger picture.
    Did someone actually tell you that, or was it a misconception that you developed by yourself?
     

    Roi Marphille

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan.
    Ruaidhrí said:
    The arrival of an Irish language television station (TG4) has been a major boost to the language. However the power of English is great - Most minority languages find themselves in similar situations, I suppose.

    Ruaidhrí
    yes, TV is very important!. I'd dare to say it is essencial. When Catalan National TV was created about 20 years ago, the language had the chance to breathe again. I would say that it was the most important step for Catalan language in centuries.
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Outsider said:
    Did someone actually tell you that, or was it a misconception that you developed by yourself?
    No, nobody actually spelled it out, but it was inherent in the political/cultural climate at the time. When I was a kid, the main pre-occupation of the educational system was to convince us that we were unique and different and sooooo not English. England loomed so large in our collective memory, I think, that the notion that we (or at least our language) came originally from the heart of Europe and were actually part of a Celtic diaspora would have muddied the waters for the powers that were. We were isolationist and a tad suspicious of Europe. The important thing was not to be English.
     

    Ruaidhrí

    New Member
    Ireland/Irish/English
    Roi Marphille said:
    yes, TV is very important!. I'd dare to say it is essencial. When Catalan National TV was created about 20 years ago, the language had the chance to breathe again. I would say that it was the most important step for Catalan language in centuries.
    Absolutely. The same is true of S4C - the Welsh language TV station. The tragedy is we didn't get Irish TV 20 years ago like Catalan speakers. The language might be in a totally different position today had that happened.

    Ruaidhrí
     
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