Iron being much stronger than bronze

schweizer

Senior Member
Spanish
Hola a todos

No comprendo por qué razón ponen esta oración en el siguiente orden:

Iron being much stronger than bronze

Contexto:


Sculptors know how to strengthen the internal structure of a statue with iron braces (Iron being much stronger than bronze).

Why is not (being iron...)? Could it be that if you start by the word being, you will need a second clause. Example:

Being iron..., it is more reliable.

Muchas gracias.
 
  • gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I know that in Spanish you would say siendo el hierro mucho más fuerte que el bronce, but that order doesn't work in English.

    They used the gerund here, but they could instead have said "(iron is much...)"

    You can only use the order "being iron" in the following way.

    The bridge material, being iron, is susceptible to rust.
    The toy, being iron, stuck to the magnet.
     

    schweizer

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I know that in Spanish you would say siendo el hierro mucho más fuerte que el bronce, but that order doesn't work in English.

    They used the gerund here, but they could instead have said "(iron is much...)"

    You can only use the order "being iron" in the following way.

    The bridge material, being iron, is susceptible to rust.
    The toy, being iron, stuck to the magnet.
    Thanks a lot!
     
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