Is "bewinged" acceptable to current English?

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Trevor Zhu

New Member
Chinese
I saw "bewinged" sometimes at somewhere, but seems Office Word doesn't recognize this one, do you think this could be added as a new word or totally not acceptable?
Thanks guys
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Can you be more specific as to where you saw that word?

    "sometimes at somewhere" is rather vague and does not comply with the WR requirements for source and context.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Please give us the sentence in which you saw this word, or in which you would like to use it.

    (You can create any number of adjectives by adding the prefix "be" to a participle. Whether it suits your context, or means what you want it to mean, is another question. We can't comment on that without seeing the context.)
     

    Trevor Zhu

    New Member
    Chinese
    the feathered or bewinged boys commence their adventure in new scenes, this is the sentence I wrote. I saw the word in Edgar Allan Poe's poet:
    An angel throng, bewinged, bedight In veils, and drowned in tears, Sit in a theatre, to see A play of hopes and fears, While the orchestra breathes fitfully The music of the spheres.
    But only here, therefore I'm not sure whether I can use this word.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Trevor.

    "Bewinged" is poetic and very old-fashioned. It would be a poor choice in your sentence. "Winged" is fine in today's English.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It's a nice imaginative sentence. Add a capital letter to the beginning, and period at the end, and it's fine. ;)
    .
    The feathered or bewinged boys commence their adventure in new scenes.
    .
    You wouldn't use 'bewinged' in ordinary speech, but I suspect you know that already. :)
     
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