Is Boston (name of the city) related to the Persian word Bustan?

TazmaninaDevil

New Member
English
I know that Bustan means a green and lush place, and since Boston is such a place, I thought perhaps when the colony was founded the founders thought of calling it so.
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thousands of towns in the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and so on are named after pre-existing towns in Britain (and other parts of Europe). I don’t think there can be any doubt that Boston in Massachusetts is named after Boston in Lincolnshire.
    "Boston" meant Botolph's Town.
    My Oxford Dictionary of English Place Names (OUP 1998) disagrees with this. It says that the first mention of Boston is as “Botuluestan“ in a document of 1130. It says the name means “stone (marking a boundary or meeting place) of a man called Bōtwulf. Identification of Bōtwulf with the 7th century missionary St Botulph is improbable”.
     
    Last edited:

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Well, if we're talking originally --

    Shawmut was the name of the peninsula where (part of) Boston now stands. At least that's how the English colonists anglicized the Native American name.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Well, okay, but Trimountaine wasn't a city either.:cool:
    There are many towns in the US that take their name from the name that Native Americans gave to the place associated with the location of the current city. For example, in Maine: Madawaska, Wiscasset, Skowhegan, Sebago, Millinocket, Norridgewock.
     
    Last edited:

    Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    I guess it's irrelevant because the relation of Boston and Persian Bustan is farfetched, and anyway: the word bustan, borrowed by Aramaic, Hebrew and Arabic in ancient times, is said to be بو (bu = fragrance) + ستان (stan = land, place).
     
    Top