is built vs is build

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adicte

Senior Member
French (France)
Hello!

Could you please tell me which one is correct?

"The development of the course is build / is built on the achievement of the exam."

Thank you for your help!
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The past participle is 'built' used adjectivally, if you like, after the verb (to) 'be', while 'build' is the infinitive form. Unless your sentence fails to convey what you intend, any confusion is somewhat surprising. Perhaps you really do need to+ infinitive to express purpose; it's hard to tell what the sentence is supposed to mean.
     

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Thank you!

    I'm trying to say that the development of a course/lesson is built around the completion of an exam. This exam is the foundation on which the progression of the course is structured/built.

    I don't know if it makes more sense now..

    Thank you!
     

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Maybe "progression" or "advancement" is better than development in this case. I mean, the way the course advances.

    But I think your suggestion fits here.

    Thank you!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Another perspective… I find the OP sentence easily understandable but not well written. The term “build on” doesn’t really work. “Based on” or (better still) “geared towards” would make more sense in that particular construction — the meaning being that the design of the course focuses specifically on helping students pass the exam.
     

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    hmmm ok. So it's getting even more complicated since I'd like to imply the idea of "progression of the course = progression in time + progression in difficulty. "
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In that case your meaning is not as clear as I thought. Perhaps you mean that as the course develops it’s geared more and more towards the forthcoming exam? If so, “builds towards [achievement…]” is a possibility.
     

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    In that case your meaning is not as clear as I thought. Perhaps you mean that as the course develops it’s geared more and more towards the forthcoming exam? If so, “builds towards [achievement…]” is a possibility.
    I'm not sure. It is not very clear for me either. The text doesn't help since it doesn't provide a lot of details.

    What about: "the progression of the course is built towards the achievement of the exam" ?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To use build transitively as “build something towards something else” makes no sense. Your is built does not mean the same as builds as I intended it in #10. BUILD: Make or become stronger or more intense (like a piece of music building to a crescendo).
     

    Laodamia

    New Member
    General British
    Your problem is the 'completion' of an exam. Your original 'achievement' is franglais. Do you mean passing an exam? Something like 'This course prepares students for the X exam' would be simple and direct.
     

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Hi!

    Thanks for replying! Actually, I wanted to ask if "completion" worked better. You read my mind! :)

    Thank you, but I'm afraid your suggestion doesn't work because I'd like to keep the original idea of "a progression constructed (?) /based on the completion of the exam". Your suggestion implies that, I get it, and I prefer simple constructions as well, but I don't get to choose.

    Maybe it will work the other way around... :idea: What about "the completion of the exam as the core element for building the course progression"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    That’s worse. Course progression is not a standard term. But, if this is accurate, you could say that “the course content is progressive, gradually working up to the exam itself”.
     

    Laodamia

    New Member
    General British
    <-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    Building on Lingobingo, how about
    'The course content is progressive, building in difficulty to prepare students for the exam'?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    adicte

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Hello again,

    Well, I'm sorry, I was trying to change the structure to see if I could make it clearer. Of course, I appreciate your help and efforts (especially Lingobingo's who kept posting suggestions).

    <-----Reply to now-deleted comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    I'll take your options and see what I can do, there are still better than mine anyway.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
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