Is de gempmum gone?

Yichen

Senior Member
Chinese
hello everyone

Could you please tell me what "gempmum" means in the following?

‘Is de gempmum gone? Huccome you din’ ast dem ter stay fer supper, Miss Scarlett? Ah done tole Poke ter lay two extry plates fer dem. Whar’s yo’ manners?’

I've made a wild guess but still don't know what its original word is.

Is the [gempmum] gone? How come you didn't ask them to stay for supper, Miss Scarlett? I have told Poke to lay extra plates for them. What's your manners?


Thank you.
 
  • Yichen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Got it and thank you.:thumbsup:
    I thought it should mean something like "gentlemen", but "gempmum" doesn't sound like gentlemen to me. :)
     

    Yichen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Please let me ask another question that is somewhat off-topic here:

    ‘You ain’ got no mo’ manners dan a fe’el han’, an’ affer Miss Ellen an’ me done labored wid you. An’ hyah you is widout yo’ shawl! An’ de night air fixin’ ter set in!

    What does "fixin’ ter" mean here?
    You've got no more manners than a field hand, and after (often?) Miss Ellen and I have labored with you. And how you is without your shawl! And the night air [fixing to] set in!

    Many many thanks
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Fix = to prepare, to be on the verge of (Southern US).

    I wouldn't like to read this novel! The only way I can make sense of it is to pronounce the words and guess from the sound.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    ‘You ain’ got no mo’ manners dan a fe’el han’, an’ affer Miss Ellen an’ me done labored wid you. An’ hyah you is widout yo’ shawl! An’ de night air fixin’ ter set in!

    What does "fixin’ ter" mean here?
    You've got no more manners than a field hand, and after (often?) Miss Ellen and I have labored with you. And here you is without your shawl! And the night air [fixing to] set in!
    The idea behind the first sentence is that Miss Ellen and the speaker have spent time teaching Scarlett proper manners.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    I must assume the work you're quoting is Gone with the Wind. The person whom you are quoting is an African American slave whose English is not considered "standard" by the "white folk" of the time. The author is trying to transcribe that style of speech.
     

    Yichen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes. What I've quoted is uttered by Scarlett's African American mammy.

    Thank you all again.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top