Is "Doamna Febrelor" accurate for "The Lady of Fevers"?

febris

New Member
Turkish
I'm fairly new to Romanian, I have been studying for only 5 months and I want to use more Romanian in my artwork. A while ago I used "Doamna Febrelor" as "the lady of fevers", is it accurate?
 
  • Hi, and welcome!

    Thank you for taking an interest in Romanian!

    It's always a great idea to give us a bit more context to work with. Is this the title of your artwork? Can you be more specific as to what you're trying to convey?

    Your translation seems pretty literal, and I can't say it's "wrong", but to me it doesn't really mean anything. :( Are you making a reference to something related to St Mary?
     
    Is this the title of your artwork? Can you be more specific as to what you're trying to convey?

    Your translation seems pretty literal, and I can't say it's "wrong", but to me it doesn't really mean anything.
    It's about a character I made. She's the personification of fevers so I thought "the lady of fevers" would be a good title and I love Romanian.
     
    Yes, could be a translation - curious minds might come up with a better metaphor for this character but based on the context you've provided it should work.
     
    Some observations here:

    Romanian febră does not have plural:
    febră - declensions
    It is in the same category with other Romanian nouns like:
    - foame ("hunger") - see: foame - declensions
    - frică ("fear"), which has a plural frici, but rarely used
    see: frică - definitions where they say "... (rar) frici ...")
    - sete ("thrist") - see: sete - declensions
    etc.

    This is why the other Romanians here found very peculiar the notion of Doamna febrelor.

    Also using the singular like in Doamna febrei sounds a little strange, but is a better option.

    On the other hand, the English term "fever" has 2 meanings: Definition of FEVER

    If you meant "fever" as a state of emotion it would make better sense.
    A possible translation would be:
    Doamna neliniștilor
    (meaning more exactly: Lady of Unrests)
     
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