Is "Impact" verb? --- Impinge, affect, influence--

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Suzuka51

Senior Member
Japanese
I have been taught that "impact" is a noun by a native speaker.
The sentence, "Some of the changes will largely impact" was corrected to "some of the changes are rather significant". The reason was, "impact" is a noun.

However, in the dictionary, there are both verb and noun and, further, "impact" can be transitive and intransitive.
But also, I have seen the explanation that impact is a noun in this forum.

#1. Some of the changes will largely impact (intransitive)
#2. Some of the changes will largely impact on the event schedule (intransitive).
#3. Some of the changes will largely impact the event schedule (transitive).
#4. Some of the changes will have a large impact (noun).

If the dictionary is right, all the above sentences are supposed be correct, but, practically, only #4 is idiomatic. Correct?

Related to these, I found the phrase "impinge on" from the former threads and learned it can be replaced with, maybe "#2".
Does impinge is "direct, but sounds transient" compared with "influence" or "affect" like "impact"?
 
  • Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Over the years I have witnessed impact, known only as a noun, claim verb status. It is now quite common, at least in AE, to use it as a verb. Personally, I still continue to say "have an impact on."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both our WordReference Random House dictionaries and our Collins dictionary list impact as both a noun and a verb. Your native English-speaking friend is wrong.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The WRF dictionary (Random House) has this note:


    • The verb impact has developed the transitive sense "to have an impact or effect on'' (The structured reading program has done more to impact the elementary schools than any other single factor) and the intransitive sense "to have an impact or effect'' (The work done at the computer center will impact on the economy of Illinois and the nation). Although recent, the new uses are entirely standard and most likely to occur in formal speech and writing.
     

    Suzuka51

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you everyone.

    The reaction was different from what I expected.
    In this forum, what a dictionary says is not always common, but about "impact", the dictionary was right.

    I would appreciate if anyone answer the other question.

    I found the phrase "impinge on" from the former threads and learned it can be replaced with, maybe "#2".
    Does impinge is "direct, but sounds transient" compared with "influence" or "affect" like "impact"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    impact [on] = have a strong effect on

    impinge [on] = have an effect on, especially a negative one

    affect = have an effect on / make a difference to
     
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