Is it ice-lolly

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi
In summer, children like to eat ice cream—like things to resist heat. What do we call the type of thing with wooden handle in the ice? Is it ice-lolly or popsicle? If neither, what do we call it?

Thanks a lot!!!
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    In American English the ones that are fruit-flavored ice are Popsicles - that's a brand name, but we use it as a generic name. If they're ice cream, we call them "ice cream bars."

    edit: Crossposted with maxillarypun.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thanks. But can I also call it "ice-lolly"? Someone told me there is an ice-holly,but I can't find it from dictionaries
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    There doesn't seem to be a simple country-neutral word for this - a word that everyone would regard as plain English for the thing. In Australia it's an icy pole, for example - yet another term.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    In the US, a "lollipop" is a hard candy on a stick; we would just picture a frozen one of those (and we'd wonder why anyone would want to freeze one).
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    The Associated Press Stylebook, which is normally really good at offering generic alternatives to trademarked names, offered this and only this for Popsicle: "flavored ice on a stick."

    Which is useless. Can you imagine? "Mom, the ice cream man is coming. Can I get some flavored ice on a stick?" That sounds silly in AmE and I'm sure it does in BE as well.
     
    Last edited:

    jdb90

    Member
    English (Scottish)
    Ice lolly or or just "lolly" is used in BE for those. "popsicle" is US english, if you said that in Britain, you would get some funny looks, but they would know what you meant from TV.
     

    dadane

    Senior Member
    English-London
    I have always been of the belief that there is no generic term. Even in NZE, which is very close to BE, 'lolly' has a slightly different meaning and, consequently, so would 'ice lolly'. This leaves the AE/BE half-way house 'ice pop' as the only real option.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As a child in the East Midlands, the local word for the "frozen juice" type of ice-lolly was 'an iceberg'.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Ice lolly or or just "lolly" is used in BE for those. "popsicle" is US english, if you said that in Britain, you would get some funny looks, but they would know what you meant from TV.
    I had no idea what a popsicle might be before I came on this forum. I might have guessed it was some kind of lollipop but not an ice one.

    Unfortunately It seems that there is no generic term.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    From my perspective, "ice pop" isn't bad. I'm pretty sure I'd be able to figure out what it meant, even though in some parts of the U.S. (including the part I live in) "pop" means "soft drink." That's not the term I use, but that's because I'm not from here. I think even a native-born Midwesterner would be able to guess that ice pop=Popsicle.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    From my perspective, "ice pop" isn't bad. I'm pretty sure I'd be able to figure out what it meant, even though in some parts of the U.S. (including the part I live in) "pop" means "soft drink." That's not the term I use, but that's because I'm not from here. I think even a native-born Midwesterner would be able to guess that ice pop=Popsicle.
    Yes. I'll go along with that. :thumbsup: ice-pop would be understandable to me as well.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    What about something like 'stick ices'? Ice can be used in BrE to mean ice cream or ice lolly, and Google seems to turn up some instances of 'stick ices' from American sites too.
     

    vivace160

    Member
    American English
    What about something like 'stick ices'? Ice can be used in BrE to mean ice cream or ice lolly, and Google seems to turn up some instances of 'stick ices' from American sites too.
    With some context I'd probably figure out what a person means by "stick ice", but if someone randomly asked if I wanted a stick ice, I wouldn't have any idea what they were talking about. I've never heard it before now.

    I personally use popsicle and ice pop interchangeably for flavored ice on a stick (I also call the flavored ice in the plastic tubes - the ones you buy in liquid form and freeze at home - ice pops, never popsicles). I'm not familiar with any other words for it.
     
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