Is it possible?

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britneyM

Banned
Japan Japanese
Is it possible for S6 to mean M1 or M2?

S6: It's been ten years since you've been here.

M1: It's been ten years since the point of time when you started to be here.
M2: It's been ten years since the point of time when you stopped being here.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Is it possible for S6 to mean M1 or M2?

    S6: It's been ten years since you've been here.

    M1: It's been ten years since the point oftime when you started to be here.
    M2: It's been ten years since the point of time when you stopped being here.
    It's been ten years (it has been that length of time)/since you've been here (since you were last here).

    The sentence means M2 (not M1) but M2 is not grammatically correct. You would say:

    "It's been 10 years since you were last here" OR
    "It's been 10 years since you left" OR
    "It's been 10 years since you were here" OR (as close to M2 as I can come):

    "It's been 10 years since the point in time when you left". This sentence is awkward, though, and I would go with one of my other suggestions.
     

    britneyM

    Banned
    Japan Japanese
    Thank you very much for your prompt reply.
    Please let me confirm.

    Is it possible for S6 to mean M3 or M4? In other words, Is it possible to use S6 in situation M3 or M4?

    M3: You started to be here ten years ago, you've been here since then, and you're here now.
    M4: You started to be here fifteen years ago, you were here for five years after that, you stopped being here ten years ago, you haven't been here since then, and you're not here now.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank you very much for your prompt reply.
    Please let me confirm.

    Is it possible for S6 to mean M3 or M4? In other words, Is it possible to use S6 in situation M3 or M4?

    M3: You started to be here ten years ago, you've been here since then, and you're here now.
    M4: You started to be here fifteen years ago, you were here for five years after that, you stopped being here ten years ago, you haven't been here since then, and you're not here now.
    There is only one meaning for S6, Britney... you have not been here for 10 years. That's it - no other possible meanings. You might be here now or you might not. The sentence doesn't tell us that. It only tells us that you haven't been here for 10 years.
     

    Cristina Allende

    Senior Member
    US, English
    "It's been 10 years since the point in time when you left". This sentence is awkward, though, and I would go with one of my other suggestions.
    For this sentence, I would actually say: "It's been 10 years since the point in time in/at which you left." The word "when" just sounds strange. By changing it to either "in which" or "at which," you eliminate this confusion. Though, by all means, the first three (?) sentences you provided are much more precisely worded! :)
    Christina
     

    britneyM

    Banned
    Japan Japanese
    Thank you very much for your quick and detailed replies.
    I understand very well and am so happy to know M4 is incorrect.
    Thank you.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank you very much for your quick and detailed replies.
    I understand very well and am so happy to know M4 is incorrect.
    Thank you.
    You misunderstand, Britney. M4 is correct. M4 says:

    "You started to be here fifteen years ago, you were here for five years after that, you stopped being here ten years ago, you haven't been here since then, and you're not here now."

    You started to be here in 1992. You were here from 1992 until 1997 (ten years ago). You left ten years ago therefore you haven't been here since;
    you haven't been here for 10 years. This is exactly what your original sentence said ("S6: It's been ten years since you've been here.").
     

    britneyM

    Banned
    Japan Japanese
    Thank you, Dimcl

    I mistook.
    I wanted to say 'I am so happy to know M3 is incorrect' but I said 'I am so happy to know M4 is incorrect.'

    I'm so sorry. I think you were very surprised to find me saying 'M4 is incorrect.' Thank you very much for making me notice my mistake.
    Thank you.
     
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