is knowledgeable and competent vs possesses competences and experiences

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marcbatco

Senior Member
Italian-Italy
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is correct:
She (is knowledgeable and competent)/(possesses competences and experience) in identifying, quantifying and mitigating hazards and managing risks by employing methods for risk assessments such as HAZOP, FMEA, etc.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    You would not use 'competencies' (plural) like that. You possess competence, even if it is in more than one area.
    In almost all circumstances 'is competent' is better than 'possesses competence'; the latter expression looks like there might be a missing 'some degree of', which suggests a lesser competence than 'is competent'. only if a person isn't fully competent might you try to gloss over this by saying they 'possess competence', not, I might add, that I in any way recommend doing this.

    Knowledge and experience are different things. You can be knowledgeable or have knowledge and you can be experienced or have experience. As with possessing (or having) competence, The 'be' forms are absolute, the 'have' forms carry a suggestion of something less.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm not sure that I've ever seen the plural "competences," though it may exist; we generally use "competencies" (as Uncle Jack does) instead.

    Another option: "she is knowledgeable and proficient in identifying etc." "Competent" is a tad underwhelming.
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    You would not use 'competencies' (plural) like that. You possess competence, even if it is in more than one area.
    In almost all circumstances 'is competent' is better than 'possesses competence'; the latter expression looks like there might be a missing 'some degree of', which suggests a lesser competence than 'is competent'. only if a person isn't fully competent might you try to gloss over this by saying they 'possess competence', not, I might add, that I in any way recommend doing this.

    Knowledge and experience are different things. You can be knowledgeable or have knowledge and you can be experienced or have experience. As with possessing (or having) competence, The 'be' forms are absolute, the 'have' forms carry a suggestion of something less.
    I'm not sure that I've ever seen the plural "competences," though it may exist; we generally use "competencies" (as Uncle Jack does) instead.

    Another option: "she is knowledgeable and proficient in identifying etc." "Competent" is a tad underwhelming.
    Hi Uncle Jack and The Newt, and thank your for you suggestions. And, would it be correct to write: She is experienced and proficient (or competent) in identifying, ...?
     

    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    Yes, that is fine.
    Thank you, Uncle Jack. And, in your opinion, which of the following options is more appropriate (and, do they have the same meaning?):
    She is also experienced and proficient in identifying, quantifying and mitigating hazards and managing risks by employing methods for risk assessments such as ...
    She is also knowledgeable and competent in identifying, quantifying and mitigating hazards and managing risks by employing methods for risk assessments such as ...
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Proficient and competent have similar meanings (proficient sounds better than competent, though). Knowledgeable, experienced and proficient are three different things though.

    A person can be knowledgeable about something, but be absolutely useless at doing it. A person could have years of experience in doing the thing badly. The only unambiguously positive term is "proficient"; they do the thing well (though they may have neither much experience or much theoretical/background knowledge).

    We aren't meant to proof read here, but really you would do a lot better to use one adjective and one activity:
    She is proficient in carrying out risk assessments
    She is proficient in risk-management​
    It might not say everything that you want, but it has a better chance of being read.
     
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