Is or has expired

yamaya

Senior Member
sinhala
Hello members,
I submitted a question(1) mentioned below to the forum some days ago.A member of this forum explained with an example & I would like to thank him. But later I saw a message(2) of the kaspersky virus guard as given below.

(1) My home is located in front of the church. My home has located in front of the church.
According to his explanation, My home is not doing the action of locating therefore it is incorrect.

(2) Your license has expired. To keep your protection up to date, please renew the license.
If the second sentence is correct, why don't we use the underlined sentence in the sentence no:(1).
Can't we use " Your license is expired"? like we use my home is located in front of the church.
Best regards & thanks.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The things involved are different. It is actually quite hard to explain why!

    When something has expired it has finished the action. Your house has not finished being located in front of the church. To talk about that in the past we can just say it WAS located.

    We do, sometimes, use "has" with the verb located, for instance when it refers to an enterprise choosing the place to site its business. e.g. XYZ electrics has located at the end of my street. We do not use that construction with homes.

    These might just be conventions rather than actually logical things, although some linguists are quite good at noting the subtle differences in life which lead to these differences in language, I am not one of them!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    They're different grammatically.

    In (1) "located" is a past participle being used like an adjective and describes where the house is.

    In (2) "has expired" is the perfect tense of the verb to expire and describes what has happened.

    I have seen constructions such as 'Your license is expired' but they're not really correct.

    :)
     

    yamaya

    Senior Member
    sinhala
    They're different grammatically.

    In (1) "located" is a past participle being used like an adjective and describes where the house is.

    In (2) "has expired" is the perfect tense of the verb to expire and describes what has happened.

    I have seen constructions such as 'Your license is expired' but they're not really correct.

    :)
    Yes but if the application of is located is permitted as an adjective, why can't we use is expired as an adjective to convey this idea. Isn't there any standard method of explaining this? Those of us who wish to learn good English have to face difficulties.Hope native speakers like you could respond to this problem.
    Thanks.
     

    neal41

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I prefer "Your license has expired", but I regard "Your license is expired" as fully acceptable.

    'Expire' is an intransitive verb which indicates a change of state. The 'has expired' form where 'expired' is part of a compound verb can be transformed into the 'is expired' form where 'expired' functions as a predicate adjective. I have not been able to think of any other intransitive verb which allows this transformation, but I feel sure there are some.

    In the case of transitive verbs the passive form with 'has been' can often be transformed into an 'is' form.
    The work has been finished. -- The work is finished.
    Your license has been renewed. -- Your license is renewed.
    The house has been repainted. -- The house is repainted.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I prefer "Your license has expired", but I regard "Your license is expired" as fully acceptable.
    I agree with Neal.
    We say that a license (or a subscription, as to a magazine) has expired when its limited effective life has ended. But "expired" can also be regarded as an adjective, and "is" is acceptable in that sense. Has is still preferable, though.

    Yes, English is confusing. We know that. :(
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I have seen constructions such as 'Your license is expired' but they're not really correct.
    I agree, Donny, that 'Your license has expired' sounds more natural (to me) than 'Your license is expired', but I don't think you could claim that the second one is incorrect on the grounds that "expired" isn't an adjective. We say "He's driving with an expired licence" (clearly an adjective), so that would support the idea that the licence is expired.

    I think it's down to whether the verb indicates a state (often resulting from a change), as Neal mentioned, though not to whether it's transitive or intransitive.

    Verbs not indicating a resulting state (past participle not used as an adjective):
    - We have seen the fox [transitive] >> The fox has been seen — does not become The fox is seen, nor It's a seen fox.
    - He has hit my car [transitive] >> My car has been hit — does not become My car is hit, nor It's a hit car.
    - She slept [intransitive] >> [no passive] — does not become She is slept, nor She's a slept woman.
    - He spoke
    [intransitive] >> [no passive] — does not become He is spoken, nor He's a spoken man.

    Verbs indicating a resulting state (past participle can be used as an adjective):
    - Neal's three examples [all transitive] (finished, renewed, repainted) — can become ... is finished, is renewed, is repainted; also finished work, renewed licence, repainted house.
    - Your licence has expired [intransitive] — can become Your licence is expired; also You have an expired licence.
    - My son has grown up [intransitive] — can become My son is grown up; also My son is a grown man.

    So:
    - My house is located ... [state]
    - Your licence has expired. [action]
    - Your licence is expired. [state]

    Ws
     

    ayuda?

    Senior Member
    An attempt to try to answer you questions
    Your Quote: My home has located in front of the church.
    My home is not doing the action of locating therefore it is incorrect. :tick:

    (1) My home is located in front of the church. [state] [the result of an action]
    The participle form [the -ed form of a verb] is used with is/was to indicate this.
    It functions like an adjective rather than a verb.
    **This is what I would technically refer to as the statal/stative passive.
    The home is not performing any action—this is what resulted after the home was built there [from an action.]

    (2) Your license has expired. [from the verb to expire]
    Can't we use " Your license is expired"? like we use my home is located in front of the church. :tick:
    (2) Your license has expired. [action] [ a past form of the verb to expire [expired/has expired/had expired]
    This is an action,[ an intransitive verb, in this particular case—one that doesn’t take a direct object or an indirect object]
    Your license is expired. [state] resulting from an action] (of an intransitive verb—in this case.)
    The participle functions like an adjective with a form of the verb to be.
    The participle [the -ed form of a verb] is used with is/was to indicate this.

    :arrow: Note: It is possible to say: “Your license is expired.” Though, there is something about it that, admittedly, does not sound right to a lot of people, I imagine.
    http://www.dmv.org/mo-missouri/renew-license.php [“If your driver’s license is expired, you can still renew it.”]

    Extra Note: Another example in the plural (are/were—if the subject is plural):
    The chairs over there are/were removed. [state] [resulting from an action]
    [Somebody removed/has removed/had removed the chairs from the room. [action—the verb]

    Sorry for any redundancy. Things were spliced and edited haphazardly.

    EDIT: Cross-posted with wordsmyth
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top