is (pronunciation)

kira_moondance

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Long time ago, I read an article. They said in British English, "is" is pronounced "is" and in American English, "is" is pronouced "iz". I'm not so sure about this :confused:
 
  • AmEStudent

    Senior Member
    Italian/Albanian - bilingual
    /ɪz/, but it can merge with the next word if it starts with an s,
    e.g. is special can sound like /ɪs'pɛʃəɫ/.
     

    Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    /ɪz/, but it can merge with the next word if it starts with an s,
    e.g. is special can sound like /ɪs'pɛʃəɫ/.
    Really? I would switch off the vocal chords so that the voiced /z/ was transformed seamlessly into the unvoiced /s/. Perhaps this is BE?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The only contribution I can make is to comment that one of the many good ways of talking English in a generic 'foreign accent', is to say 'is' as if it were like 'hiss'.

    "Eet iss market.com not 'meercat.com'". (Obscure reference to a British TV ad which has meercats talking with some sort of vaguely middle European/ Russian/ Slavonic accent. Actually, they are tallking, not torking )

    Hermione
     

    koniecswiata

    Senior Member
    Am English
    One of the things that distinguishes English from languages such as German, Polish or Russian (good examples of Central to Eastern European languages) is that English has voiced final consonants, and those other languages only have unvoiced final consonants. This leads to English pronouncing "iz" or "bread" as opposed to "iss" or "brett"--which are stereotypical German accents when speaking English.
     
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