Is ''quit on'' still commonly used?

kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi all,

I came across this example on a paper:

We shouldn't quit on drug addicts. Instead, we should try to help them.
I find no thread related to quit on in the EO forum, and I can't find definition of it in my own dictionary. According to the definition offered by this paper, it's equal to give up on. My doubt is: is this phrase verb still widespreadly used by native speakers? I suppose in many situations we can use quit in place of quit on without any change in meaning, like in the original sentence given.

Is my guess right?

Many thanks.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi Kenny. Yes, this is a phrase used to mean "give up on". You cannot replace "quit on" with "quit" in this sentence, however, because then your sentence would be:

    "We shouldn't quit drug addicts. Instead, we should try to help them."

    which is incorrect.

    To "quit on" is still used in this context although I'm not sure how widespread it is.
     

    Avignonais

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, Anglophone
    Agree: it is still used, but don't know how widespread. It is informal. In writing I would use "give up on", not "quit on"
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Hi Kenny. Yes, this is a phrase used to mean "give up on". You cannot replace "quit on" with "quit" in this sentence, however, because then your sentence would be:

    "We shouldn't quit drug addicts. Instead, we should try to help them."

    which is incorrect.

    To "quit on" is still used in this context although I'm not sure how widespread it is.
    Hi, Dimcl

    Thank you very much. I've got it.:)
     

    estefanos

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    We shouldn't quit on drug addicts. Instead, we should try to help them.
    I'm not familiar with a verb "quit on", but "quit" can be used with "on". In the example cited, I associate "quit" with "try", and "quit on them" is equivalent to "quit trying to help them".

    A common usage is "He quit on me", or something similar. The difference between this and a simple "He quit" is that the "on me" expresses a feeling of abandonment or disappointment. There was the expectation that he was not going to quit.

    "He up and quit on me" (colloquial AE?) adds surprise ("up") to the occasion.


     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    "On" in this case is not part of the verb but part of the adverb phrase "on drug addicts". An "on" adverb phrase like this can be used with just about any verb.

    The meaning of to do something "on [somebody]" is to do it to that somebody's detriment or disappointment, to adversely affect that person by doing it.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    "On" in this case is not part of the verb but part of the adverb phrase "on drug addicts". An "on" adverb phrase like this can be used with just about any verb.

    The meaning of to do something "on [somebody]" is to do it to that somebody's detriment or disappointment, to adversely affect that person by doing it.
    Hi, Forero

    Do you mean there is no phrase verb ''quit on''? If so, that explains why I can't find it on M-W and Dictionary.com.
     
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