IS.- RUBRICADO.

Uncle BBB

Senior Member
German
IS.- RUBRICADO. is from a notary deed of a contract about the separation of goods in a matrimony.

The line is at the end:

Ley de tasas 8/89. Documento sin cuantía. IS.- RUBRICADO.
The next line is: Es copia exacta...

I understand the line but not the IS part. Impuesto? But what could the S be. Sociedades?

But that makes no sense. So no amount is mentioned in the document. And the document is rubricado. What would you put in between those two facts that starts with I and S?

Thank you very much in advance!
 
  • Joe Esquire

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain- English US
    It appears that the reference is to Spanish law with respect to fees related to issuance of official documents. So that documents denominated “sin cuantía” are subject to a flat fee, instead of a sliding scale value of transaction fee.

    As to the second part, a copy of notarial deed would normally spell out the name of the person signing, before the word “rubricado”. However, it is possible that the person signing only applied his/her initials, instead of a scripted “rubrica”, serving as the signature. And that may be what you have.

    (A close reading of Spanish Law 8/89 does not contain any reference or meaning for the term “IS” denoting any particular charge or exemption, thus I feel reasonably certain that the term does not pertain to the fee due.)

    Please see the attached link for further guidance on notary-designated signing terminology.
    Signado, firmado, rubricado, sellado, timbrado al inglés

    Regards,
    /je
     
    IS are the persons signals who rubricated (signed). "Es copia exacta" means that the rubrication is confirming that (this copy) is exactly as the original.

    In middle age the signature was rubricated, i.e. volutes were drawn under the signature (the handwritten name), or they could even replace the name completely. They were always done in exactly the same manner in order to detect falsifications. In modern times the legal meaning is to subscribe or give testimony of something.
     

    Joe Esquire

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain- English US
    IS are the persons signals who rubricated (signed). "Es copia exacta" means that the rubrication is confirming that (this copy) is exactly as the original.

    In middle age the signature was rubricated, i.e. volutes were drawn under the signature (the handwritten name), or they could even replace the name completely. They were always done in exactly the same manner in order to detect falsifications. In modern times the legal meaning is to subscribe or give testimony of something.
    To my knowledge, the term “Volute” is an architectural term, and, in English, does not pertain to the ornamental elements historically used below a signature. (As in the prominent signatures on the US Declaration of Independence, for example). While the term “Voluta” in Spanish appears to have a broader application according to the RAE, it is not an equivalent translation.
     
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