is segol with yud, a long vowel or a short vowel?

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ralphzak

New Member
English
is segol with yud, a long vowel or a short vowel? does segol even occur with a yud?

does modern hebrew have long and short vowels or is it only biblical hebrew?

I know that long/short vowels are a grammatical thing in biblical hebrew. but is a vowel being long or short more of a grammatical thing only, or something that is pronunciation related too?

Also, Do you ever get a patach followed by an aleph or heh, and if so, is it still a short vowel?

Thanks
 
  • Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    is segol with yud, a long vowel or a short vowel? does segol even occur with a yud?
    It occurs in a certain set of pronominal suffixes, for example עָלֶיךָ. However, this yud here is merely an orthographic relic. It really makes no difference at all whether the segol is written with a yud or not, it is the same vowel regardless.

    That said, there are those who claim that a segol in an open stressed syllable was a long vowel. There is some evidence for this. A segol in a stressed open syllable occurs not only in the words like עָלֶיךָ, but also in words like שָׂדֶה and מֶלֶךְ.

    does modern hebrew have long and short vowels or is it only biblical hebrew?
    In Modern Hebrew, there is no length distinction in vowels. However, the classical categorization of long and short vowels is still relevant to formal grammar (though not so much to spoken Hebrew).

    I know that long/short vowels are a grammatical thing in biblical hebrew. but is a vowel being long or short more of a grammatical thing only, or something that is pronunciation related too?
    Yes, long vowels were actually pronounced longer in Biblical Hebrew.

    Also, Do you ever get a patach followed by an aleph or heh, and if so, is it still a short vowel?
    Yes, for example:

    מַה שִּׁמְךָ: Here the patach is clearly short, because it is closed by the dagesh in the ש.

    לַאדוֹנִי: Here the patach may be interpreted as long, since it is an open syllable coming from the elision of the א. However, it is disputable, and it is not unique to being followed by an א, but rather only because the syllable is open. Another example would be עֲבַדְתַּנִי, where the last patach might be interpreted as a long vowel.

    But as you can see, in ALL cases, the letters אהוי do not "make" a vowel long, but rather they are more likely to be found when the vowel is long. The only real way to tell if a vowel is long or short is by considering whether the syllable is open or closed and by considering whether it is stressed or not.
     
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