Is Sergius to Russian Sergey irregular?

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Catagrapha

Member
Malagasy
Why did Sergius become Серге́й in Russian rather than Серг(ь) (like Antonius > Anton, Aemilius > Emil) or Сергий (like Georgius > Георгий, Gregorius > Григорий)?
Is -е́й expected from -aeus rather than -ius?
 
  • ahvalj

    Senior Member
    Yes, this is the regular development. These names were borrowed into Old Church Slavonic and Old East Slavic with -ии/-ьjь, at the turn of the 11/12th centuries the final ь (it was a short vowel then, like the English i's in it, pit or more open) disappeared, and the remaining ь developed into е in virtually all cases, for example: ѹлии/ulьjь>улей, людии/ļudьjь>людей, син҄ии/siņьjь>синей. In the adjectives and in church-regulated names, these ей could have been found in the unstressed position in writing until the first third of the 19th century. Whenever ий appears in the modern language in an old word, it is a Church Slavonicism. The short names like Антон have originated non-phonetically, being either borrowed in the shorter form or randomly restructured.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The short names like Антон have originated non-phonetically, being either borrowed in the shorter form or randomly restructured.
    They were mostly loaned as such (from German and French for the most part), if they aren't familiar or simply popular folk forms (like Yegór <<< Gr. Georgios), in which case shortening becomes generally expected. On the other hand, some popular Russian Orthodox folk names got -ей/-ий through hypercorrection; e.g. Kliméntiy <<< Lat. Clemens (cf. Ch. Sl. Klimént), Kondrátiy < Gr. Kodratos < Lat. Quadratus (Ch. Sl. Kondrát).
     

    Catagrapha

    Member
    Malagasy
    Is Klimentiy from Clementius modelled after Innocentius, Vincentius, etc.?

    In reverse, some etymologies say Innocent Inocente are from Innocentius, Vincent Vicente are from Vincentius, etc.
    I would say Innocent Inocente are from innocens, Innocenzo Inocencio are from Innocentius, Vincent Vicente from vincens, Vincenzo from Vincentius, etc.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think we need an expert on Latin and Greek here. However, the main point is there is no "St. Clementius" at all, only "St. Clemens" (apparently Greek knows two forms of the name: "Klimis" Κλήμης and "Klimentos" Κλήμεντος, the latter originating from the Latin indirect case forms). The Church Slavonic name Климентъ must have been a loan from Byzantine Greek; and the Russian folk form Климентий is entirely analogical basing on other names on -Vтий which were typically losing -ий in the folk speech (cf. Панкрат < Панкратий < Παγκράτιος, Игнат < Игнатий < Ἰγνάτιος). If the Russian peasants had come to see -ий as just some kind of "honorific" or "pretentious" formant is a matter of discussion.
     
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