is so obviously admissible

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Stray Lamb

Senior Member
Portuguese
Hi! What does "I think it is so obviously admissible that I am at a loss for words" mean in this sentence:

«I [Bugliosi] noted: “The prosecution is alleging Mr. Manson ordered these murders. It was his philosophy that led up to these murders. The motive for these murders was to ignite Helter Skelter. I think it is so obviously admissible that I am at a loss for words.»

Source: "Helter Skelter", by Vincent Bugliosi.
 
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    This was said in response to a defense motion to declare evidence of the motive inadmissible; that is, to keep the jury from hearing that evidence. (This is what we mean by “context.”)

    Bugliosi responds that it is so obviously something the jury should hear, that he can’t think of anything to say. (He’s exaggerating; we prosecutors always have something to say.:))
     

    Stray Lamb

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    Thanks pob14 :) In this excerpt, Bugliosi refers to the "offer of proof". I saw what it means, but unfortunately the legal terminology is not my strong suit. Can you explain to me what "offer of proof" is in layman's terms? Or is "proof offer" better known by another name?
     
    Last edited:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    An “offer of proof” is when the attorney tells the judge what the evidence will be. That way the judge can rule on an objection before the jury hears evidence that might be improper.
     

    Carolinian

    Member
    English-American
    We don't use the definite article (the) there.

    Unfortunately, legal terminology is not my strong suit.

    Unfortunately, medical terminology is not my strong suit.

    Unfortunately, sports terminology is not my strong suit.

    Unfortunately, grammar terminology is not my strong suit.
     
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