Is that real Korean grad student?

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Agito a42

Senior Member
Source: Love, Death & Robots (2019), an animated web series.

A couple of archaeologists accidentally awakens Dracula and it kills Simon, the younger of them. Even though Flynn, the leader of the team of mercenaries escorting the expedition, tries his best to defeat Dracula, in the end he and the surviving archaeologist have to run for their lives. They reach their camp, where they are met by Flynn's teammates, Micky (an Irish man) and Gary (an English woman). Right off the bat Gary starts fooling around; Flynn tries to reason with her.

Flynn: There's a f***ing monster out there, and it was gonna eat our asses.
Garry: Something was gonna eat your ass?
(She brushes her point finger across Flynn's forearm) Now that's a gutsy fashion statement. (She rubs her fingers together) Is that real Korean grad student?

Gary_1.jpg Gary_2.jpg Gary_3.jpg

I'm not sure if Simon was a Korean but most likely he was. Here's his picture:
simon.jpg

Any chance you can tell me what "Is that real Korean grad student?" means?
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I can see only one interpretation of those precise words. I would add a comma though. "Is that real, Korean grad student?"

    It's like saying, "Is that real, Flynn?"

    She is addressing him by his occupation rather than by his name. This indicates that she expects him to know the answer because of his impressive qualifications.

    Q: Has he been trying to impress her with his knowledge earlier in the story? If so, by calling him that she might be teasing him.

    Notes

    Flynn doesn't sound like a typical Korean name to me but maybe it is or maybe it is a westernised version of his real name.

    Gary is a man's name!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I happened to watch this last night. :)
    Earlier, they were splashed with Simon's blood, etc when the monster split Simon's head open. He is currently "wearing" Simon. Generically, he is wearing a substance/material/designer which "Korean grad student" and it is authentic.

    Is that real gold lame you're wearing or is it just shiny metallic fabric?
    Is that real Gucci you're wearing or some knock-off you bought on the street?
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I happened to watch this last night. :)
    Earlier, they were splashed with Simon's blood, etc when the monster split Simon's head open. He is currently "wearing" Simon. Generically, he is wearing a substance/material/designer which "Korean grad student" and it is authentic.

    Is that real gold lame you're wearing or is it just shiny metallic fabric?
    Is that real Gucci you're wearing or some knock-off you bought on the street?
    Are you saying the monster is wearing clothes designed by Simon?

    Could you explain, "he is wearing a substance/material/designer which "Korean grad student"? I think you missed some words out somewhere.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's a play on the usual phrase. If Vera Wang designed your dress you could say, "I'm wearing Vera Wang." = I'm wearing a dress designed by Vera Wang.

    Here, Flynn is not wearing clothes designed by Simon. He's coated with Simon's blood and guts, so he's literally wearing Simon (at least parts of him).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Are you saying the monster is wearing clothes designed by Simon?

    Could you explain, "he is wearing a substance/material/designer which "Korean grad student"? I think you missed some words out somewhere.
    The grammatical form is seen in slightly different variations which I also gave examples of. As it's a joke, it really doesn't matter which one it is.
    He is wearing <name of substance> .
    He is wearing <name of material>.
    He is wearing <name of designer>.
     
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