Is there a BRUNCH in the evening?

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kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
I've heard that there's a new word that American people use. It is a combination of I don't know what and dinner. I've been told that this new word is used to refer to the meal taken at around 5 ,6 pm.

Any help? :confused:
 
  • Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    I've never heard of it. Lots of people already eat dinner around 6pm. My friends always thought my family was weird for eating dinner after 8pm.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I have heard people jokingly use "linner" (a combination of lunch and dinner) if the meal is too late to be called lunch and very early to be dinner, but I do not know of a common word that is used in any serious way to describe such a meal.

    Some Americans go to something called "High Tea" at certain restaurants, which is borrowed from the British (and probably badly mangled in the process. :) ) It could be called a type of afternoon brunch, I suppose. There are usually small sandwiches, pastries, fruit, desserts, tea and coffee.

    I cannot think of anything else that describes a mid-afternoon or very early evening meal.

    [edit] Some restaurants offer "early bird specials" for people who dine early in the evening as a way to encourage early dining. That is not really a name of a meal, though. I wondered if you might have heard of that.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    There's the Early Bird Dinner.

    Restaurants have early bird specials - discounted meals for those folks (humorously referred to usually as senior citizens) who eat their dinner a bit early - say, before the traditional 6 o'clock hour.

    The prices are in effect from 4-6 P.M.

    AngelEyes

    edit:
    oops...I was writing while James was posting! I agree with the early bird name.
     
    Last edited:

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I'm reminded of the TV show The Simpson's:
    Homer: I've never been so embarrassed! And the worst part is this is brunch so you've ruined two meals! I'll see you all at lupper.
    An article in the times has this to say:
    Whereas the word “kwyjibo” is of no use whatever, the term “lupper”, coined by Homer to refer to a large, cholesterol-laden meal midway between lunch and supper, is so valuable I am amazed no one invented it before.
    http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article2234263.ece
    (The article also discusses another term recently brought up in the forum, the interjection "meh.")

    "Lupper," I'm afraid, is only likely to make sense to the younger segments of the population.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Dinner is the main meal of the day, regardless of when it is eaten. It is still common in farming areas to hear people speak of their midday meal as "dinner", and in much of the United States (and not just farming areas) it is common to have one's Sunday "dinner" in midafternoon. People in the US who eat "dinner" at midday will call their lighter evening meal "supper". In the UK, one traditional term for a lighter working-class meal eaten in the evening was "tea" (also known as "high tea"), which is not by any means anything elegant, and should not be confused with the light mid-afternoon refreshment of the well-to-do. That aristocratic repast may also be called "tea", but never "high tea".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree with the origin of "high tea". My English aunts were quite adamant on the subject. :) However, the phrase has been borrowed (and misused) in American English to mean an elegant late afternoon refreshment:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea_(meal)
    In recent years, high tea has become a term for elaborate afternoon tea, though this is American usage and mainly unrecognised in Britain. However, this usage is disfavored by etiquette advisors, such as Miss Manners (see below).

    http://www.coeurdalene.org/calendardetail.asp?event_id=2090&date=10/1/2006&view=week
    "Come and experience the elegance of High Tea at one of Coeur d'Alene's most beautiful and historic locations - The Roosevelt, a Bed and Breakfast (B&B) Inn...
    Menu: Breads, cheeses, fruits, sandwhichs (sic), cakes, desserts and of course, tea. With over 20 varities of tea, it is hard to choose just one!"


    Since the original poster was asking for a word specifically used by Americans to indicate a meal between lunch and dinner I thought it worth mentioning, even though it is a corruption of the original meaning.
     

    beccamutt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I have heard people jokingly use "linner" (a combination of lunch and dinner) if the meal is too late to be called lunch and very early to be dinner, but I do not know of a common word that is used in any serious way to describe such a meal.
    I've also heard "dunch", again, used jokingly.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm going to be really, really boring, kuleshov.

    And probably really, really BrE too.

    I've never heard either linner or dunch :(
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Thanks a lot!!

    I thought there was a single word everybody used in the USA, similar to BRUNCH. It seems I was not well informed...

    Cheers ;)
     
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