Is there a kitchen/lunchroom/break room/cafeteria [here] - do I need 'here'?

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MaximuS.111

Senior Member
russian
Hi! :)
Suppose I'm in a hotel and asking at the reception whether they have kitchen around with the following question:
"Is there a kitchen?"
Is this phrase complete? Or I need either 'here' or 'in the hotel' to make this question complete?
Thanks in advance!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    All three of your questions are grammatically correct and understandable.

    But I think you should reserve "Is there a kitchen?" for the context of being shown round, e.g: "Here's the bar, here's the dining room..." "I see. And is there a kitchen?"
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What do you mean by kitchen? A hotel kitchen where the prepare meals for guests? I ask because it's a slightly odd question at first glance unless you're Gordon Ramsey and want to use the facilities. If you're just concerned about starving, I would expect a question about restaurants or room service.
     

    MaximuS.111

    Senior Member
    russian
    Keith Bradford, Copyright thanks for dropping by!
    But I think you should reserve "Is there a kitchen?" for the context of being shown round, e.g: "Here's the bar, here's the dining room..." "I see. And is there a kitchen?"
    Great explanation, thanks! Now it's clear :)
    What do you mean by kitchen? A hotel kitchen where the prepare meals for guests?
    I've been to the US only once and forgot the word I saw used for almost every facility where people could take meal. Yes, it wasn't 'kitchen', it was different word...usually those facilities had fridges placed in them.
    Say, I've gotten new job and being given a tour around the office. I want to ask whether they have a place where I can eat food brought from home. What that question would be?
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Say, I've gotten new job and being given a tour around the office. I want to ask whether they have a place where I can eat food brought from home. What that question would be?
    It would depend on the work environment. They are often called "break rooms" or "lunch rooms".

    "Do you have a break room where I can eat lunch?"

    Your best option would be to just ask your supervisor where most people eat lunch if eating at work. :) That never fails. ;)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Say, I've gotten new job and being given a tour around the office. I want to ask whether they have a place where I can eat food brought from home. What that question would be?
    That would not be called a kitchen unless there was also a food preparation area (beyond a microwave and coffee maker/kettle etc and fridge) - it would often be called a lunchroom - almost a different thread needed for this question :)
     

    MaximuS.111

    Senior Member
    russian
    Thanks to everyone for your suggestions and recommendations! :) But it's not a lunchroom. Maybe I'll remember later and will bring it up here again.
    Meanwhile, everybody have great holidays! :)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks to everyone for your suggestions and recommendations! :) But it's not a lunchroom. Maybe I'll remember later and will bring it up here again.
    Meanwhile, everybody have great holidays! :)
    The lunchroom suggestion was the correct response to the "food brought from home to eat at work" question. If they served food in the place of your original question, how about cafeteria?
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    I've been to the US only once and forgot the word I saw used for almost every facility where people could take meal. Yes, it wasn't 'kitchen', it was different word...usually those facilities had fridges placed in them.
    Say, I've gotten new job and being given a tour around the office. I want to ask whether they have a place where I can eat food brought from home. What that question would be?
    If there's a place where you can sit and eat the food you brought, you can call it a breakroom (a place where you take your break from work).

    If it's just a counter with a coffeemaker and a fridge, you say "the office coffee machine" or "the office fridge".
     

    MaximuS.111

    Senior Member
    russian
    The lunchroom suggestion was the correct response to the "food brought from home to eat at work" question. If they served food in the place of your original question, how about cafeteria?
    I'm not saying that lunchroom is incorrect word :). All I'm saying is that this is not the word I saw. But now I'm starting to get a sense that my word is probably not about "place to have food at".
    Filsmith said:
    If it's not a lunchroom, break room or cafeteria, then it's definitely not the same thing that all of us are thinking. :)
    Yeah, probably it's not :).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    To get back to the original question:
    Is there an X (here)?
    Generally, you don't need "here" as the context of the conversation will be about the place you are and no one will be likely to think you mean "Is there an X anywhere in the world?" "Yes, there is an X. It's on Mars." ;)
     

    MaximuS.111

    Senior Member
    russian
    To get back to the original question:
    Is there an X (here)?
    Generally, you don't need "here" as the context of the conversation will be about the place you are and no one will be likely to think you mean "Is there an X anywhere in the world?" "Yes, there is an X. It's on Mars." ;)
    Right, I got it! :) Thanks!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We have a room at my work place where we call the pantry - with a kettle, microwave oven, a sink and a fridge. The seats are in the staff lounge or staff common room though, and people do have meals there.
     

    MaximuS.111

    Senior Member
    russian
    We have a room at my work place where we call the pantry - with a kettle, microwave oven, a sink and a fridge. The seats are in the staff lounge or staff common room though, and people do have meals there.
    Thanks, natkretep! The word is 'pantry' :). Now I assume it has little or nothing to with 'kitchen' since nobody has mentioned it before? :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We call the pantry in our office a kitchen -- with exactly the same implements as natkrtep's. So there's your connection. :)
     

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That's very interesting. The only thing I've ever called a "pantry" is a closet of sorts where mostly dry foods are stored.
    I never would have guessed "pantry" to mean a kitchenette in the workplace.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I suppose we could justify our use by the fact that sugar, tea, coffee and biscuits are also stored there!

    Some dictionaries also mention that it is also an area where food can be prepared:
    2. A small room used for the preparation of cold foods.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    After a long and thoughtful moderators' conference in the pantry cum kitchen cum break room cum lunch room in our combination hotel/office/workroom over a festive eggnog or five, we've come to the conclusion that the question of "here" has either been answered or no longer needs to be.
     
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