Is there a term for 'leafy vegetables reduced in amount from boiling'?

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
Is there a term for 'leafy vegetables reduced in amount from boiling'?

After you cook vegetables or wild herb to serve, they get shrunk and smaller in volume.

In my language, we call it 'dead.' How bout the English language?
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Well, "dead" certainly doesn't work for this in English.

    I daresay you could say something like:
    "As you cook leafy vegetables they shrink or reduce in volume".

    I can't think of an obvious word to describe the finished article, though. :(
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Well, "dead" certainly doesn't work for this in English.

    I daresay you could say something like:
    "As you cook leafy vegetables they shrink or reduce in volume".

    I can't think of an obvious word to describe the finished article, though. :(
    How do you deal with your speech when you were going to say to mean "that's small enough for one bite of yours when shrunk from boiling.", which is too long? Could you suggest what you may say in a real conversation?
     

    Moolric

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    In recipes I've read, they'd use something like "reduce down to approximately a tablespoon" (or whatever actual volume is appropriate)

    Though you could also say "keep boiling it until it's bite-size"
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, I think wilted may be the expression I was looking for, but that's recipe-related. I'm not saying it's wrong, but the perspective is a bit off, I guess. What I described was just a statement describing a state.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think "wilt" may be exactly what you need. It can indicate a deliberate action (I left the chopped cabbage sprinkled with salt to wilt in a colander; I wilted the cabbage in boiling water) or simply a natural process: (The vegetables in the market were all wilted in the hot sun).

    (Crossposted)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I think "wilt" may be exactly what you need. It can indicate a deliberate action (I left the chopped cabbage sprinkled with salt to wilt in a colander; I wilted the cabbage in boiling water) or simply a natural process: (The vegetables in the market were all wilted in the hot sun).
    That doesn't work for me, I'm afraid: I only associate "wilt" with the result of a natural process.

    And I don't think I've ever seen it used as a transitive verb before. :(
     

    tittiugo

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    ...just look the WRDictionary up...it just gives WILT as a transitive verb gathered to the vegetables (cook until just soft)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Specifically for boiled vegetables that reduce considerably in size when cooked, you can use "boil down".

    I put half a kilo of spinach in the pot, and it's boiled down to practically nothing.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, to wilt is a cookery term, and even if you haven't encountered it, the adjective wilted is commonly encountered in menus (eg grilled salmon served on a bed of wilted spinach).

    However, wilt is also very specific: it's cooking only up to the point that the vegetable loses its shape. The cooking referred to in the opening post might include cooking that goes beyond that point.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    If you boil 3 m³ of spinach leaves, the result is one tablespoon of dark green mush.

    (I've always found mush a very handy term in my cookery ...)
     
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