Is there any underfloor heating in this room?

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
I am talking about some features of a school classroom in the context of practicing the construction 'there is/there are.'

I don't think I can ask about underfloor heating using "any":
Is there any underfloor heating in this room?

It is because I would assume that there might be some unspecified quantity of underfloor heating. Is that correct?

Thank you.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It depends on what you might understand or assume about underfloor heating. If you think the room might have it or it might not, then you would not say 'any', and say instead, 'Is there underfloor heating in this room?'

    If you think there might be underfloor heating in part of the room, or you think there are varying degrees of underfloor heating, then 'any' is fine.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think I can ask about underfloor heating using "any": Is there any underfloor heating in this room?

    It is because I would assume that there might be some unspecified quantity of underfloor heating. Is that correct?
    That’s right. It would be a rather strange thing to say, for the reason you state. Probably the most normal way of asking about it is one that doesn’t even use there is/there are: Does this room have underfloor heating?

    But I’m sure there are plenty of other things in the classroom that you could make examples of instead.
     

    Jimbob_Disco

    Senior Member
    British English
    What classrooms have underfloor heating anyway?! You’d be much better off with more basic items...
     
    Last edited:

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I was chosing features or things which did not exist in the classroom.
    There were not any plants in the room. I think I could ask: "Are there any plants in the room?"
    There was not any water in the vase. I think I could ask: "Is there any water in the vase?"
    In the previous lesson students learned that "any" can be used in questions with uncountable nouns and plural countable nouns.

    In the textbook there is a description of an unusual detached house in Italy. It says:
    "There's also central heating and double glazing in part of the house."
    There is also a question in exercise 6: "Is there central heating in the detached house?"

    Source: New Total English Elementary. Pages 50 and 51.
     
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    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    What classrooms have underfloor heating anyway?! You’d be much better off with more basic items...
    St Paul's CE Primary School in Stafford, UK, has some underfloor heating:
    "All classrooms are carpeted to improve the acoustic environment.
    3 classrooms have underfloor heating to remove the danger of radiators for children."
    Source: St Paul's CE Primary School Accessibility Plan 2014.

    There isn't any underfloor heating in my school, though.

    Could I also say: "There isn't underfloor heating in my school."
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Could I also say: "There isn't underfloor heating in my school."
    You would do better to say 'there is no underfloor heating in my school'.
    'Isn't' without 'any' really requires underfloor heating to be the subject of the discussion, or at least mentioned immediately beforehand:
    Jane: My school has underfloor heating. It's wonderful!
    John: There isn't underfloor heating in my school.​
    Even then, 'any' is usually better.
     
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