is true

Verbena162

New Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone!
In the following sentence, which one should be chosen? And why? Thanks in advance.

Expenditure on health has gone down, and the same ________ education.
A. is true to B. is true of C. is true with D. is true on
 
  • Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    In American English, we say that a is statement is true "about," "concerning," or "of" something else, but not that it is true "to" something else. "About" and "of" are the idiomatic prepositions to limit the applicability of the truthfulness of a statement to a designated field, set of persons, things, or concepts, etc.

    The answers propose four different prepositions, only one of which is used in this kind of statement.

    It's hard to keep all of these prepositions straight, which is why dictionaries often include them with definitions of words that may be accompanied by prepositions. The same thing is true of other languages that use prepositions. For instance, a good German-, French-, or Spanish-English dictionary would have the word in that language for "true" and then indicate which preposition in the target language is used as the equivalent of English "of" or "about."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you are "true to" something, you are loyal to it. To use "true with", I would say "This is also true with regard to education."
    I believe that "true for" would work but that's not one of the choices.
     

    Verbena162

    New Member
    Chinese
    In American English, we say that a is statement is true "about," "concerning," or "of" something else, but not that it is true "to" something else. "About" and "of" are the idiomatic prepositions to limit the applicability of the truthfulness of a statement to a designated field, set of persons, things, or concepts, etc.

    The answers propose four different prepositions, only one of which is used in this kind of statement.

    It's hard to keep all of these prepositions straight, which is why dictionaries often include them with definitions of words that may be accompanied by prepositions. The same thing is true of other languages that use prepositions. For instance, a good German-, French-, or Spanish-English dictionary would have the word in that language for "true" and then indicate which preposition in the target language is used as the equivalent of English "of" or "about."
    Thanks a lot for your explanation. So in this context, it would be correct to use "be true of" or "be true about". Am I right?
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Yes, Verbena, you could say "is true of," "is true about," or "is true concerning," or Myridon's additions, "is true for" and "is true with regard to." Stylistically, you should use the shorter prepositions and especially avoid "with regard to," but the latter is not ungrammatical.

    Which preposition to use with a particular adjective or verb is high idiomatic and arbitrary. Native speakers just absorb most of these combinations by hearing or reading them as children. Those learning English as adults have to work hard to memorize them, or have to consult dictionaries that are complete enough to include them. There don't appear to be any "logical" rules for them, or at least any rules that conform to the "logic" of other languages.
     
    Last edited:

    Verbena162

    New Member
    Chinese
    Yes, Verbena, you could say "is true of," "is true about," or "is true concerning," or Myridon's additions, "is true for" and "is true with regard to." Stylistically, you should use the shorter prepositions and especially avoid "with regard to," but the latter is not ungrammatical.

    Which preposition to use with a particular adjective or verb is high idiomatic and arbitrary. Native speakers just absorb most of these combinations by hearing or reading them as children. Those learning English as adults have to work hard to memorize them, or have to consult dictionaries that are complete enough to include them. There don't appear to be any "logical" rules for them, or at least any rules that conform to the "logic" of other languages.
    Hi, Fabulist, thanks again! It really helps a lot. As an English learner for more than 10 years, the phrasal verbs and prepositions are always big and annoying problem for me, especially when I watch movies or TV series.
    I guess the only way to understand them is by accumulating ...
     
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