is "worker" a nominalization?

luisesanz

New Member
Spanish
The nominalization of verbs is often frowned upon. Should I consider
word "worker" as a nominalization? Are there "good" nominalizations?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Difficult question, luisesanz:)

    Use of nouns rather than verbs in English is often an indicator of formality.

    Can you give us another example of the sort of thing you have in mind?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Welcome to the forum, Luise Sanz. This is a good observation: we often avoid using nouns to describe the action of verbs. However, they can be useful: The merchandise was delivered = the delivery of the merchandise. If I were you, I wouldn't worry too much about nominalization just yet. If you find yourself using a lot of abstract nouns ending in "___tion", then you would probably enliven your writing by turning those abstract nouns back into verbs. There is no reason to avoid the noun "worker". That is an everyday noun that people use all the time. Use it freely.:)

    PS I just saw Loob's answer. I share her curiosity about what it is that concerns you. Some more examples would be very helpful to help people figure out how to help you avoid excessive nominalization.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    The nominalization of verbs is often frowned upon. Should I consider
    word "worker" as a nominalization? Are there "good" nominalizations?
    Even if "the nominalization of verbs is often frowned upon" were true--I am more familiar with the "verbing" of nouns being met with criticism--it would not apply to words which have been in English for centuries, as worker has.
     
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