ish - suffix

BasedowLives

Senior Member
uSa
Hey all

I was wondering if there was a spanish equivalent to the "ish" in english. It probably isn't grammatically correct in coloquial usage at all, but it'd be nice to know:)

You can add it on many words to make it sound like it has "hints" of whatever characteristic you are speaking of. For Example:

That car is kind of orangish
It's kind of chocolatish

sorry if it seems unnecessary, but its killing me!
 
  • Mariaguadalupe

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    It sure isn't proper Spanish, but in Mexico we use:

    Ese auto es medio anaranjadito.
    or
    Es medio chocolatoso.

    I don't think we would say, chocolateado.

    But I think many people would say all three are grammatically incorrect. People on the north of Mexico, tend to say everything in the diminutive.

    (OOPs)
     

    gdiaz

    Senior Member
    Chile - Español
    Equivalent can be "ado".
    V.g.
    That car is kind of orangish
    El coche/automóvil es como anaranjado.
    It's kind of chocolatish
    Es como achocolatado.
     

    Eugens

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish
    I agree with Mariaguadalupe. I would say that "ese auto es medio naranja" o "medio anaranjado". I would add "medio" to say that anything is "-ish", "sort of", "kind of". I was also going to say I say "chocolatoso"! :D This is fairly informal, though.
     

    BasedowLives

    Senior Member
    uSa
    haha, ok thanks. i know it's really informal, as it is in english, except in english you wouldn't get stared at!:p

    but, i'll stick with "medio" like you all say.

    Thanks for the info
     

    Mariaguadalupe

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    Well let me rephrase myself.

    You'll get stared at by the uppity classes. If you're among the young and irreverent,

    enjoy! That's everyday, informal speech!

    "medio" is playing it safe.
    :D
     

    don_tomlinsoni

    New Member
    Scotland, English
    I think "medio..." works in a lot of Spanish speaking countries, at least in Latin America.
    Also, if you're using it in the sense of a time I would use "como"

    e.g. We're going to eat at 8.30ish
    Vamos a comer a como las ocho y media
     

    diegodbs

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    don_tomlinsoni said:
    I think "medio..." works in a lot of Spanish speaking countries, at least in Latin America.
    Also, if you're using it in the sense of a time I would use "como"

    e.g. We're going to eat at 8.30ish
    Vamos a comer a como las ocho y media
    Tienes razón, en España también se utiliza en ese contexto la palabra "como", pero: "Vamos a comer como a las ocho y media" y no "a como".

    - Llegó como a las diez.
    - Nos fuimos como a las cuatro.

    - Es un coche así como rojo.
     

    Jellby

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Reddish -> "rojizo"
    Yellowish -> "amarillento"
    Greenish -> "verdoso"
    Whitish -> "blancuzco"
    Brownish -> "pardusco"
    Bluish -> "azulado"
    Greyish -> "grisáceo"
    Bronzish -> "broncíneo"

    Can you give more?
     

    Soy Yo

    Senior Member
    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    BasedowLives said:
    Hey all

    I was wondering if there was a spanish equivalent to the "ish" in english. It probably isn't grammatically correct in coloquial usage at all, but it'd be nice to know:)

    You can add it on many words to make it sound like it has "hints" of whatever characteristic you are speaking of. For Example:

    That car is kind of orangish
    It's kind of chocolatish

    sorry if it seems unnecessary, but its killing me!
    You might get stared at in English if you say "chocolatish"...it's a hard word to say and you're unlikely to be understood the first go round.
     

    Ana_Fi

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Jellby said:
    Reddish -> "rojizo"
    Yellowish -> "amarillento"
    Greenish -> "verdoso"
    Brownish -> "pardusco"
    Bluish -> "azulado"
    Greyish -> "grisáceo"
    Bronzish -> "broncíneo"
    Whitish -> "blancuzco" o "blanquecino"
     

    aleCcowaN

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    We say in Argentina

    (Es) mas bien alto
    (Es) mas bien bajo

    and colloquially

    (Es) tirando a alto
    (Es) tirando a bajo

    "tirando a *" is colloquial for all *-ish you can imagine, but it is used in Argentina.
     

    Kraderif

    New Member
    Mexico
    Here is what you are looking for:

    wordreference.com/definicion/-sco
    There are other suffixes that are the same as -sco: -asco, -esco, -isco, -izco, -usco, -uzco

    In fact, in Spanish, there are can be many translations for the "ish" suffix, depending on the word that you put it on. Also, you can apply more than one suffix to the same word and all they can be valid, but maybe with a slightly different sense, for example, derogatory.

    However, all of them are mostly used the same way: that something is related to, or "kind of", or is like something else, but there can be other usages: for belonging, size, or to describe a group of something.
     

    Kangy

    Senior Member
    Argentina [Spanish]
    I was gonna say that we don't just have one suffix like the English "-ish", but millions of them! :p So you could use almost any.

    We even invent suffixes sometimes. Of course it's not grammatically correct, but it's done.
     

    Kraderif

    New Member
    Mexico
    There are over 400 suffixes in Spanish, and you could easily add to your list -acho, -oso, -aco, -ado, -aino, -ín, and God knows how many more.
    Yes I know, I was just mentioning some of them, the ones most used and that could be more appropriate in Spanish for the English "ish".

    But nice observation, thank you.
     

    GloGloo

    Member
    Spain-Spanish
    this pimp ish gets no older

    ¿Eso quiere decir: este atontado nunca madura? ¿es correto?
    en español se diría este chulo nunca mudara, pero creo que no se puede hacer una traducción totalmente literal porque en español (al menos en aquí en España) no se lo añade ningún sufijo al adjetivo chulo, por lo que se tendría que recurrir a otras formas
     

    riverita40

    New Member
    spanish
    what kind of grammar rules can I apply when using -ish with times and numbers such as five-fivish, etc??? I mean SPELLING RULES.
     

    amvook

    New Member
    American English, Mexican Spanish
    I think "medio..." works in a lot of Spanish speaking countries, at least in Latin America.
    Also, if you're using it in the sense of a time I would use "como"

    e.g. We're going to eat at 8.30ish
    Vamos a comer a como las ocho y media
    Actually the correct translation for that would be

    "Vamos a comer a las 8 y media" there's no ish and no way to translate that in my opinion, and I know what you're trying to say with "como a las ocho y media" that'd be "we're going to eat around 8:30", you'd have to use "around" and not "at".

    Now the whole thing "vamos a comer a como las ocho y media"
    "a comer a" that to me is a typo!

    hehehe
     

    jones888

    New Member
    English - EEUU - Minneapolis
    Hello to all,
    Really old thread, but I thought I´d bring it back to life. This is an interesting topic in language, and I´m sure lots of people are wondering about it...that´s how I found it.

    I´m learning spanish in Buenos Aires and a lot of people here use the word TIPO to signify "like" "kind of" "ish."

    Llegamos tipo ocho. "We arrived at, like, 8"
    Habia tipo seis hombres alli "There we, like, 8 men there"


    It, to me, seems somewhat like the valley girl accent of California. The stereotypical accent you see in movies, etc.

    Thoughts?
     
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