-ish

erin2010

Member
Catalan

Hi!

I guess that "6-ish" is refering to the time but I'm wondering where does it come from? when do we use this expression?

"Can you stop for a drink tonight 6-ish?"

Thank you


 
  • Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's something that was present in most Proto-Indo-European languages. It's present in Germanic languages and I've just checked etymonline.com and they say it's also in Greek as -iskos (remember 'sk' changed to 'sh' in Old English, or pre-Old English) as the same reflex exists in Nordic Languages which didn't have the [sk] shift to [sh] and they have the same suffix (i.e. Icelandic -iskur).
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    when do we use this expression?
    Hi Erin. Some of us use it all the time, incessantly, ad nauseam:rolleyes:
    Pick me up at 6ish.
    Did you have a good journey? ~ Yeah, brilliant ... well, brilliant-ish.
    It should be arriving tomorrow ... ish.
    etc. etc. etc.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's something that was present in most Proto-Indo-European languages. It's present in Germanic languages and I've just checked etymonline.com and they say it's also in Greek as -iskos (remember 'sk' changed to 'sh' in Old English, or pre-Old English) as the same reflex exists in Nordic Languages which didn't have the [sk] shift to [sh] and they have the same suffix (i.e. Icelandic -iskur).
    The proto-Slavonic adjectival ending -ĭskŭ is represented in modern Slavonic languages, for example in the Russian -skiy (for example Russkiy = belonging to Rus', an old name for Russia).
     
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