Isn't/is she coming out with us?

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
A: We won't see Lisa this evening.
B: Why not? (1) Isn't she coming out with us? or (2) Is she coming out with us?

Can you please explain the difference between (1) and (2)?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    What do you think the difference is, taraa?

    Hint: (2) would be a very strange thing to say in that context.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    What do you think the difference is, taraa?

    Hint: (2) would be a very strange thing to say in that context.
    The negative in (1) means that they expect the listener to agree with them, right? But (2) is strange as you said
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    The problem is that (2) asks a yes/no question when the speaker already knows the answer is "no".
    In (1) the speaker is asking for more information.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The problem is that (2) asks a yes/no question when the speaker already knows the answer is "no".
    In (1) the speaker is asking for more information.
    Thanks a lot :)
    Can #1 also be just for a 'yes' answer?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    With (1), the expected answer is a confirmatory "No". But as I said, the reason the speaker is asking the question is probably because s/he is hoping for some additional information.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    With (1), the expected answer is a confirmatory "No". But as I said, the reason the speaker is asking the question is probably because s/he is hoping for some additional information.
    Sorry I'm confused. But I thought the answer is "Yes, she isn't coming with us", like the following example in "Grammar in Use"
    -Don't you want to go? Yes. (=Yes, I want to go)
    No. (=No, I don't want to go)

    Why did you answer with "NO", please?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    But I thought the answer is "Yes, she isn't coming with us",
    No, we wouldn't say, :cross:"Yes, she isn't coming".

    A. We won't see Lisa this evening.
    B: Why not? Isn't she coming out with us?
    A. No, she's not/she isn't coming out with us. She has to work.
    B. Ah, I see.

    Look carefully at the Grammar in Use example and you'll see the same pattern:)
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    No, we wouldn't say, :cross:"Yes, she isn't coming".

    A. We won't see Lisa this evening.
    B: Why not? Isn't she coming out with us?
    A. No, she's not/she isn't coming out with us. She has to work.
    B. Ah, I see.

    Look carefully at the Grammar in Use example and you'll see the same pattern:)
    Thanks a lot :)
    So it doesn't matter whether the question is asked in negative form or positive, we will answer the same way, right?
    Don't you want to go? Yes, I want to go or No, I don't want to go
    Do you want to go?Yes, I want to go or No, I don't want to go

    Right, please?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, I hadn't thought of it that way before - but yes, you're right!:)


    Except that if we're contradicting a negative question, we'd probably use the emphatic form:
    Don't you want to go? Yes, I do want to go.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Well, I hadn't thought of it that way before - but yes, you're right!:)


    Except that if we're contradicting a negative question, we'd probably use the emphatic form:
    Don't you want to go? Yes, I do want to go.
    Thank you so much Loob for the helps :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top