Isn't the said Mary the groom's ex?

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kuleshov

Senior Member
Spain Spanish
Let's imagine we are at a wedding, and a group of guests are talking about a person who hasn't been invited to the wedding. This person is called Mary. After hearing this name a few times someone asks, "Isn't the said Mary the groom's ex?"
My question is: can we use said as an adjective to refer to someone who has been mentioned earlier?
Does it sound idiomatic in English?
Wouldn't it be better to just say, "Isn't that Mary the groom's ex?
Cheers
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    The "the said (Name)" structure you mention is now seldom used. (And I don't think it was ever used casually.) Maybe it's still used in legal writing, but I rather doubt it. It wouldn't be used in conversation... well, anywhere, as far as I know. :)
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    The way you put it ("Isn't that Mary the groom's ex?") is fine if you're differentiating one person named Mary from another person named Mary. If you're not, probably a more natural way to say it is "Isn't she the groom's ex?"
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    The way you put it ("Isn't that Mary the groom's ex?") is fine if you're differentiating one person named Mary from another person named Mary. If you're not, probably a more natural way to say it is "Isn't she the groom's ex?"
    Hello. Would these work?:
    Isn't the Mary being discussed the groom's ex?
    Isn't the Mary being talked about the groom's ex?
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    Thank you very much.

    The way you put it ("Isn't that Mary the groom's ex?") is fine if you're differentiating one person named Mary from another person named Mary. If you're not, probably a more natural way to say it is "Isn't she the groom's ex?"
    What about, "Isn't this Mary the groom's ex?
    I'm just trying to find a shorter way to refer to someone who is being discussed, and then you want to refer to that person, but using their name.
    Cheers
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The "the said (Name)" structure you mention is now seldom used. (And I don't think it was ever used casually.) Maybe it's still used in legal writing, but I rather doubt it. It wouldn't be used in conversation... well, anywhere, as far as I know. :)
    Hmm .. interesting. I think I do use it in conversation! Maybe not in this exact context, but certainly I have used " the said Mary" and didn't think it was especially formal / legal. I see it as just another way of referencing, along with the other forms mentioned in thes answers here.

    Maybe it is a US/UK variation? However, as a learner it is best to avoid things that might sound odd to the dominant group .... ;)
     

    kuleshov

    Senior Member
    Spain Spanish
    The way you put it ("Isn't that Mary the groom's ex?") is fine if you're differentiating one person named Mary from another person named Mary. If you're not, probably a more natural way to say it is "Isn't she the groom's ex?"
    Thanks suzi br.
    What about using just this? In the context I provided.
    "Isn't this Mary the groom's ex?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    My reaction is like suzi's. This expression is fairly common. For examples, look at the 'in context' link for the said.
    But look carefully at the sources. There are very few from the US, which reinforces suzi's suggestion that this is a US/UK, or AE/BE difference.
     
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