Ist uns auch zum Weinen zumute, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.

j-Adore

Senior Member
English (BrE)
(We must make the most of our lives.) Ist uns auch zum Weinen zumute, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.


I'm not sure of the function of the four words in bold.

1. Why the word order "Ist uns" instead of "Uns ist ... zumute"? Is it a conditional clause without "wenn"?

2. Does this "auch" simply mean "also"? Or does it come from "auch wenn", meaning "even if"?

3. Is this the "so" that is often used at the beginning of a main conditional clause? Or does it mean "we cannot allow it to be like that"?

4. Is it more natural to use "dürfen" like this without any infinitive verb like "tun"?
 
  • j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    So basically, can it be rephrased as:

    Auch wenn uns zum Weinen zumute ist, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.

    And what is the function/meaning of this "so"?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Auch wenn uns zum Weinen zumute ist, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.
    :tick:
    And what is the function/meaning of this "so"?
    Ich nehme an, dass es in diese Kategorie fällt (ganz sicher bin ich nicht):
    so:
    adverbiell, im Übergang zur Konjunktion fasst etwas Vorhergegangenes zusammen, weist darauf zurück und stellt so den Anschluss her
    Man könnte so auch weglassen: Auch wenn uns zum Weinen zumute ist, wir dürfen es doch/ dennoch nicht.
     
    Last edited:

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Auch wenn uns zum Weinen zumute ist, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.
    :thumbsup: It works the same way as inversion in English conditionals (but without all the restrictions).
    And what is the function/meaning of this "so"?
    I see it as part of the 'auch wenn .... so doch ....' construction.
    Other forms are possible (e.g. 'auch wenn ... dann doch...' or 'auch wenn das stimmt, ist es doch...'), but with 'so doch' it usually sounds better.
     

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    I often see a conditional statement starting with "Sollte/Hätte ...", but this may well be the first time I see a "sein" verb used at the beginning.

    Ist uns auch zum Weinen zumute, so dürfen wir es doch nicht.

    Q. Is the structure "Ist ... auch ..." (as a replacement for "Auch wenn ... ist") used colloquially and informally?

    Q. Can I see the "auch" in "Ist ... auch ..." as "sogar"?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Q. Is the structure "Ist ... auch ..." (as a replacement for "Auch wenn ... ist") used colloquially and informally?

    Q. Can I see the "auch" in "Ist ... auch ..." as "sogar"?
    Im Gegenteil, das ist gehobener Stil.

    "sogar" doesn't work. But in E. it would be "even" and in F. "même".
     

    Ief

    Senior Member
    I agree with manfy, "so" is a conjunction between two equal main clauses. I also works as two different clauses with a conjunction at the beginning of the second clause. I myself prefer the oldfashioned "allein" here.

    Uns ist zum Weinen zumute. Allein, wir dürfen es nicht.
     

    j-Adore

    Senior Member
    English (BrE)
    "Ist uns auch zum Weinen zumute, so dürfen wir es doch nicht."

    In English, it would be something like:

    "Even if we feel like crying, we mustn't."
    "We may feel like crying, but we mustn't."
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    "Even if we feel like crying, we mustn't."
    Basically I agree with JClaude, but if I look at "even if we feel..." and translate it back and forth into German, I can see that there is a bit of a connotation of 'sogar' in there. That's most evident in the form "auch wenn...." -> "sogar wenn..."
    I guess it depends on context whether it can be interpreted as 'sogar'.
     
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